Peacebuilding in Sudan: Micro- Macro Issues

Preventing Full-Scale War between Sudan and South Sudan

International Crisis Group Alert, 18 April 2012

First priority is a security deal that stops both the fighting between the North and the South, as well as Khartoum and the SRF, but for this to hold it must also be clearly linked to binding commitments to discuss and implement political reforms.

Sudan and South Sudan are teetering on the brink of all-out war from which neither would benefit. Increasingly angry rhetoric, support for each other’s rebels, poor command and control, and brinkmanship, risk escalating limited and contained conflict into a full-scale confrontation between the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) and the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Army (SPLA). Diplomatic pressure to cease hostilities and return to negotiations must be exerted on both governments by the region and the United Nations (UN) Security Council, as well as such partners as the U.S., China and key Gulf states. The immediate priority needs to be a ceasefire and security deal between North and South, as well as in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile. But equally important, for the longer-term, are solutions to unresolved post-referendum issues, unimplemented provisions of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) (that ended the civil war in 2005), and domestic reforms in both countries.


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Allahu Akbar: A Friday in Khartoum
I am sipping to my coffee as I am listening to the local imam through the loudspeaker as he addresses his congregation inside the mosque.

Ikke mer fred å få
Ingen viktige fredsavtaler er inngått i verden de siste åtte årene. De fleste «intern-konflikter» er ikke det de gir seg ut for å være. De er deler av internasjonale konfliktsystemer der eksterne aktører spiller helt sentrale roller, skriver Gunnar M. Sørbø i en utenriksanalyse i Morgenbladet.

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