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Protection of civilians: Why they die in US strikes

10 Nov 2015
The US military strike that devastated the MSF hospital in Kunduz in northern Afghanistan on 3 October generated profound, if short-lived, outrage in much of the world. The US government promised an investigation, and in late October appointed a military panel to do so. Yet its investigation is unlikely to address the more fundamental questions this attack raises: Why have US-airstrikes repeatedly produced catastrophic cases of “collateral damage” in Afghanistan?

Education fees in Nepal give households a hard time

7 Oct 2015
During my fieldwork in Ilam district, Eastern Nepal, I had the chance to visit many different homes, and to experience parts of the everyday life of Nepali families. So far, in every single stay, I was impressed by the children’s motivation for doing homework until late in the evening, and their great ability to speak English. One of them, a 4,5-years old was copying mathematical rules and letters several times, “just for fun, as he is doing it every evening”, as his older brother told me.

Five things you need to know about the SDGs

25 Sep 2015
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been criticised for being too broad and vague. What are the chances of success?

Making remittances work against money laundering

20 Jul 2015
Hawala networks can be useful partners in the work against money laundering of corruption gains, rather than the obstacle they are often considered to be.

Development aid: A blind spot for EU anti-corruption efforts

10 Jul 2015
The European Union needs to develop a coherent strategy and invest in tackling corruption outside its own neighbourhood.

Kindergardens and shootouts

6 Jul 2015 | Blogpost from Rocinha, Rio de Janeiro:
So far, kindergartens and shootouts have by and large been completely unrelated issues in my world. Not anymore. Now, for the past days, every morning around 7.30, I have slowed down and scouted cautiously: Does anyone seem tense, watchful? Are there any police troops in a state of mobilization hiding somewhere close? Are there any heavy fireworks all of a sudden, alerts of that something is about to happen?

How to curb corruption in emergencies

4 Jun 2015
At lunchtime 25 April Nepal was struck by a devastating earthquake. Following high death tolls, numerous charitable organisations scurried to the South Asian country in order to provide humanitarian aid on the ground. The United Nations alone made a flash appeal for close to half a billion USD in emergency support.

Violence against women in Afghanistan: Getting away with murder

19 May 2015
On 19 March, Farkhunda was lynched by an angry mob on the streets of Kabul. She had been falsely accused of burning the Quran. In a swift trial, four men were sentenced to death, eight to 16 years in prison. The Farkhunda trial is a statistical outlier. In Afghanistan, few men are punished for violence against women.

Covering up a massacre in Angola?

19 May 2015 | Will the international community take a stand?
In mid-April 2015, news emerged about the killing of nine police-men in Angola's Huambo province. The incident involved the police and members of Juliano Kalupeteca's "Light of the World" religious sect. In the following days, grizzling reports emerged of a massacre of perhaps hundreds of sect members. We do not yet know the truth. Angola's government appears to do its utmost to prevent knowledge of it to transpire. Will the international community remain passive?

The balancing act of moderate Islamist politics in Tunisia

12 May 2015 | CMI Field Notes
Discussions over the role Islam should play in public life, are raging in Tunisia. A veiled Tunisair flight attendant caused uproar in the Tunisian Parliament recently, writes researcher Mari Norbakk from fieldwork in Tunis.

Educating Afghan children: Blinded by numbers

8 May 2015
Access to education has been one of the main priorities for Afghan authorities and the international community for the past 14 years, but despite formidable investments in the country’s educational sector, many Afghan children leave school without being able to read or write. What has gone wrong?

Policing the Favelas: Reform, Rank, and Resistance in Rio’s Pacifying Police Units

24 Mar 2015 | Rio, March 2015
Felipe doesn’t like it much, shootouts occur almost every day, but he knows that he can’t show any signs of weakness, so he tries to keep up appearances. Two weeks after arriving at Fazendinha he was shot in a confrontation with armed traffickers.

How can Norway best support Afghanistan?

24 Mar 2015 | Afghanistan Week 2015:
The current situation in Afghanistan is the subject of two opposing narratives: one is a success story about international support and involvement since 2001; the other is a story where much has gone wrong and everything can only get worse. Agreeing on a narrative that is closer to the truth is crucial when deciding what form Norwegian support and involvement should take in the future, write Arne Strand and Liv Kjølseth.

A tale of three cities

29 Sep 2014
Maputo has been depicted as a ‘divided city’. How do the people living there imagine and engage with the city’s different urban spaces? A CMI research project, culminating in the film 'Maputo emergente. Visualising an African divided city' to be made by the Mozambican film-company ANIMA, explores this issue.

Pastoralism under stress

25 Sep 2014
The separation of Sudan and South Sudan has caused severe problems for the pastoralists living in the borderlands between the two nations. What used to be common land is now subject to border disputes and strict regulations, but cattle and goats do not respect international borders.

Human rights in Latin American

31 Mar 2014 | New RCN projects
CMI has received funding for one new project on Latin American democratisation and peace processes and one project on abortion rights lawfare.

Corruption, grabbing and development: Real world challenges

13 Feb 2014 | Book launch in Oslo
Grabbing is a major obstacle to development. It takes different forms in different countries, and standardised anti-corruption efforts fail. Experienced practitioners and researchers present corrupt practices from around the world challenging anti-corruption efforts and explaining why they have failed.

Diversifying to avoid the resource curse?

20 Dec 2013
Diversification spreads risk as countries expand into new export sectors, but does diversification also improve institutions and address the resource curse? Diversification strategies were top of the agenda at the UNIDO General Conference in December.

Is Dos Santos pushing his luck?

19 Dec 2013
While the Angolan president José Eduardo Dos Santos may be grooming his son to follow him as president, political opponents of his regime have been eliminated. This year he has spent long periods of time abroad. Meanwhile, the social crisis in the country increases in scope. The opposition is organising their strengths. Even in the president's own ranks, there are murmurs of discontent. Has Dos Santos gone too far?

Engaging with the public

28 Nov 2013
How can Supreme Audit Institutions engage and involve citizens at all stages of the audit cycle? This question was top of the agenda at the Open Government Partnership's Annual Summit in early November.

Judicial Battlefield over the Right to Abortion in Latin America

30 Sep 2013 | BreakfastForum
Paola Bergallo and Rachel Sieder in conversation with Åse Gilje Østensen.

Include Southern voices in the new development agenda

15 Jul 2013
As the Millennium Development Goals are coming to an end, international actors have started working on a new set of development goals for the global community. Last time around, the majority of the inputs came from institutions in the North. Will the voice of Southern actors be heard this time?

Participation as an anti-corruption tool

30 May 2013
In the TALEARN Community of Practice, practitioners, activists, funders and researchers join forces to strengthen the impact and increase the scale of transparency and accountability interventions.- It is individuals on the frontline pushing for greater transparency and accountability on the part of governments who best understand the challenges inherent to this type of work, says Nils Taxell, senior adviser at CMI's U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre.

When numbers speak volumes

28 Jan 2013
The unique collection has made the library at the Bergen Resource Centre for International Development the most popular specialized library in Norway. In 2011, more than 5000 volumes were on loan all over the country. -The collection is an invaluable resource to researchers and policymakers, says Carol Priestley.

Emerging South powers in Africa: The West in retreat?

18 Dec 2012 | New book:
China, India, Brazil and South Africa have become major economic actors and players on the African continent. The role of the West and traditional development aid is rapidly changing. Has the emerging South powers' entry into the African continent changed the name of the game?

Women in the market: Equal opportunities?

28 Nov 2012
A field experiment from Tanzania shows that business training improves sales and profit figures for men, but has no effect for women's business performance. -Promoting development among female entrepreneurs is challenging and needs comprehensive measures. We need to pay more attention to the external constraints that limit their possibilities, says Bertil Tungodden.

Iranian industry in limbo

26 Nov 2012
A thwarted industrial policy, poor economic governance and external tensions have brought Iran's industrial class to the brink of extinction. They are trapped in between the revolutionary rhetoric of the Islamic republic and unfulfilled attempts of economic pragmatism.

Facilitating small businesses: The Ethiopian experience

31 Oct 2012
The Ethiopian government has followed a top-down cluster development strategy by constructing working premises for small businesses. So far more than 2075 working premises have been built with a total cost of over 300 million birr. Why do most of the premises remain empty despite highly subsidized rent?

Born in the USA

24 Oct 2012
This year, Professor Philippe Bourgois from the University of Pennsylvania was invited speaker at the Bergen Summer Research School (20-22 June), co-hosted by the CMI. During his visit, he was interviewed on his long-term research among drug-addicts in inner-city US ghettos. His research will be linked to a new program on urbanization and urbanity at CMI (Nefissa naguib and Are Knudsen).

Heading for trouble in Afghanistan

26 Sep 2012
With the support of NATO and the US, Afghan warlords are regaining strength. -The international community has chosen a dangerous path, warns researcher Akbar Sarwari.

Breaking the landlords' hold on labourers

31 May 2012
The transition from a feudal to a modern economy has changed the labour market in Nepal. There are more and better paid jobs available, also outside the agricultural sector. Yet, some Nepalese labourers in rural areas continue to have coercive traditional contracts with landlords. Government programmes can help poor families out of these contracts through access to insurance, credit and social services.

Hunting for per diems

23 Apr 2012
Allowances, or per diems, have become an important source of income for civil servants in sub-saharan Africa. -Existing practices need to be revised, says CMI-researcher Tina Søreide.

The power of the masses

30 Mar 2012
Last year, discontent voters managed to get rid of Zambia's contested president Rupiah Banda. What is the success formula for overthrowing a regime based on electoral authoritarianism? Part of the answer lies in the urban masses.

Gold over love: Making sense of corporate community development projects

27 Feb 2012
Corporate community development projects typically do not fail due to incompetence. They fail because promoting development is not their underlying objective. Making money is.

Diversifying an oil rich economy: Why and how?

9 Jan 2012
Policies for diversification should focus on international regulation that affects elite incentives, rather than on domestic industrial policy in countries where the economy is in the hands of a few, concludes researchers.

What will two Norwegian ministers achieve in Angola?

21 Nov 2011
Angola suffers from gross inequality, widespread poverty and a reputation for authoritarianism and corruption. However, this does not scare off foreign investors. The former Portuguese colony is enormously rich in natural resources, and is a main destination for Norwegian investments in Africa.

Global solutions to global challenges?

3 Nov 2011 | Global Health Challenges
Health challenges are a common concern in the era of globalisation. How can we make sure children get high quality health services?

Litigating their way to better health

2 Nov 2011
Litigating health rights does make a difference. However, it varies to whom. Court cases brought by NGOs often contribute to better health care for the poor. Other cases primarily benefit middle class people who have resources to go to court.

Litigating Health Rights

31 Oct 2011 | Book launch
Alicia Ely Yamin and Siri Gloppen, the authors of the new book Litigating Health Rights, opens the Global Health Challenges week with a book launch of their book on health right litigation in Costa Rica, South Africa, India, Brazil, Argentina and Colombia.

Latin American and African Perspectives

24 Jun 2011 | Seminar Gender Justice and Legal Pluralities:
Anne Hellum and Rachel Sieder share perspectives, experiences and thoughts on gender justice and legal pluralities in Africa and Latin America based on long-term fieldworks and extensive scholarship on the subject.

Political economy analysis of the UN Convention against Corruption

9 Feb 2011 | Seminar
The UN Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) is arguably the most advanced and most global anti-corruption treaty. Its topical and geographic scope raises questions of adaptability. U4 coordinator Hannes Hechler presents a political economy analysis of UNCAC and its implementation processes.

City limits: Urbanisation and vulnerability in Sudan

3 Feb 2011 | ODI Case Study
The rapid expansion of Sudan's towns and cities confronts humanitarian and development agencies with new and complex challenges.

China in Africa: What role does China play in Angola's reconstruction programme?

23 Nov 2010 | CMI Seminar:
China's role in Angola is particularly massive and major loans have been provided for Angola's reconstruction in exchange for access to Angola's oil. Corkin explores the role of the Angolan government in the evolvement of Chinese-Angolan relations.

Public Policies in Latin America: From Legal and Policy Commitments to Actual Participatory Processes

27 Oct 2010 | Mini Series on Latin America
Even if a formal commitment expressed in legal frameworks exists, participation is not always easy to implement, and not all societies are used to open spaces for a broader participation. Camilla Gianelli raise some questions regarding the risk of adopting participatory mechanisms as a recipe.

U.S president Obama UN speech on Sudan

6 Oct 2010 | Video
Remarks by U.S. President Obama in a Ministerial Meeting on Sudan.