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The donor dilemma

22 Dec 2016

Colombia: A peace that will last?

9 Dec 2016 | Nobel Peace Prize
Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos managed to secure approval for the new peace agreement between the government and FARC before he comes to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize on December 10.

How to do accountability differently through the vertical integration of civil society advocacy and monitoring

21 Sep 2016
Despite the proliferation of civil society monitoring and advocacy initiatives, accountability failures are still persistent. Vertical integration provides a strategy for civil society initiatives to minimize the loopholes in their advocacy and monitoring which facilitate the perpetuation of corruption and inefficiency.

U4 Proxy Challenge Competition 2016 – Call for proposals

1 Sep 2016
The Proxy Challenge Competition was launched in 2013 to help aid donors better assess the results of anti-corruption efforts. In 2014, U4 ran the first edition of the challenge, and brought together a body of promising, bespoke proxy indicators. In this second round we still aim to find the best proxy indicators that can track progress of anti-corruption reform initiatives. We need reliable, intuitive, accessible, and cost-effective assessment methods that are useful across country-contexts.

2016 Bergen Exchanges on Law & Social Transformation

22 Aug 2016
The Bergen Exchanges on Law & Social Transformation is an annual interdisciplinary meeting place for scholars who want to understand the interplay between law and social change. The lectures, roundtables and panels bring together scholars and practitioners from all over the world. Welcome

Assisted return not a permanent solution for all asylum seekers

3 May 2016 | Blog post
Many asylum seekers who choose assisted return are from a country destroyed by war and conflict. More than half of those who return to countries such as Afghanistan and Iraq plan to migrate again. Assisted return is a viable type of support to assist with the return, but is not sufficient to prevent large numbers of people once again leaving insecure countries of return. Only minor changes are required, however, to increase the potential for permanent return.

Corruption risk management: a smarter option for development aid

2 May 2016
A risk management strategy that can identify, assess and propose specific mitigation measures for corruption problems can help better address corruption. When done right, corruption risk management can contribute to increase development impacts.

Reduce judicial corruption and improve access to justice for all

26 Apr 2016
Corrupt judicial systems undermine reforms and are a major impediment to ensuring access to justice and human rights for ordinary citizens across the world, says a new report published by the United Nations Development Programme and U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre on 8 April. Titled, A Transparent and Accountable Judiciary to Deliver Justice for All, the report cites survey data suggesting that the public perceive the judiciary as the second most corrupt public institution, after the police.

Research results

16 Mar 2016
Does self-serving elite behaviour make citizens more politically active? If we inform voters about the elite’s use of tax havens, are they more likely to take part in elections and other political processes? And does the form on the information matter, are voters more inclined to respond to information that stokes their moral indignation?

Shared Prosperity

15 Mar 2016 | The Chr. Michelsen lecture 2016: Kaushik Basu
Kaushik Basu is an Indian economist and academic who is Senior Vice-President and Chief Economist of the World Bank. In the Chr. Michelsen lecture he will discuss the normative properties of shared prosperity and the implications for actual policymaking, especially in the presence of globalization.

Announcement of the Chr. Michelsen Prize 2016

15 Mar 2016
The Chr. Michelsen Prize for outstanding development research 2016 is awarded to Francesca R. Jensenius, Senior Research Fellow at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI).

Honduras slipping back into authoritarian rule

4 Mar 2016
Honduras has become one of the world’s most dangerous countries for activists. In the early hours of 3 March yet another prominent activist was murdered. Indigenous leader and human rights and environmental activist Bertha Cáceres was shot by unknown gunmen in her own house.

Legislative Candidacy in Electoral Authoritarian Regimes. Evidence from Tanzania

26 Feb 2016
Authoritarian regimes is the most common regime type aside from democracy. In these settings, the ruling party permits opposition but stifles their chances to win. Why do individuals run for legislative office on opposition versus ruling party tickets in such regimes? asks Keith Weghorst, Post-doctoral fellow at Vanderbuilt University in this seminar.

Leveraging open government for engaging citizens and improving transparency

25 Jan 2016
A series of case studies on the implementation of Open Government Partnership (OGP) reforms found that civil society participation fosters successful implementation, and that the limited capacity of local governments and civil society actors can be an obstacle for reform. Political commitment and strong coordination at the country level also improve the implementation record of OGP National Action Plans.

Mæstad continues as Director at CMI

23 Dec 2015
Ottar Mæstad has accepted an extension of his engagement and will soon enter his second term as Director at the Chr. Michelsen Institute.

Results Based Financing: The health system perspective

24 Nov 2015 | Regional workshop
Many experts see the introduction of results based financing (RBF) schemes as an opportunity to strengthen, or even reform, health systems; however, they are also a potential source of new risks and challenges that are not well understood.

Protection of civilians: Why they die in US strikes

10 Nov 2015
The US military strike that devastated the MSF hospital in Kunduz in northern Afghanistan on 3 October generated profound, if short-lived, outrage in much of the world. The US government promised an investigation, and in late October appointed a military panel to do so. Yet its investigation is unlikely to address the more fundamental questions this attack raises: Why have US-airstrikes repeatedly produced catastrophic cases of “collateral damage” in Afghanistan?

Towards a common standard for development agencies’ integrity systems

9 Nov 2015
An eventual OECD integrity guideline for development agencies should emphasise communication around ethics regimes and control systems, assessment and management of corruption risks, and moving towards joint responses in donors’ integrity systems.

What you need to know about extreme poverty

5 Oct 2015 | SDGs
End poverty in all its forms everywhere is goal number one in the new Sustainable Develelopment Goals. Magnus Hatlebakk explains what extreme poverty is.

Steps to limit the endemic corruption around junior mining companies

4 Oct 2015
High environmental risks and questionable development outcomes characterise the mining industry. A myriad of small companies operate in competitive, high-risk, high-reward settings with weak institutions that fail to enforce regulations. Such conditions are highly conducive to corruption, violence, and environmental destruction.

The European Commission pledges to do more with development partners to tackle corruption

2 Oct 2015
The U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre´s call for more EU action to curb corruption in non-EU partner countries hit a European nerve.

Maputo - Ethnography of a divided city

25 Sep 2015 | Movie preview
This is a film about a city. Maputo is a young African capital city emerging at the frenetic rhythm of the global financial demand. Some say it’s not meant for everyone. People from different backgrounds welcome us into their neighborhoods and help us see through their eyes the real Maputo.

Five things you need to know about the SDGs

25 Sep 2015
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been criticised for being too broad and vague. What are the chances of success?

Stopping illegal trafficking of endangered species requires combatting corruption

3 Sep 2015
Corruption and illegal trafficking endanger the world’s biodiversity

Covering up a massacre in Angola?

19 May 2015 | Will the international community take a stand?
In mid-April 2015, news emerged about the killing of nine police-men in Angola's Huambo province. The incident involved the police and members of Juliano Kalupeteca's "Light of the World" religious sect. In the following days, grizzling reports emerged of a massacre of perhaps hundreds of sect members. We do not yet know the truth. Angola's government appears to do its utmost to prevent knowledge of it to transpire. Will the international community remain passive?

Corruption hunters - investigating and prosecuting financial crime

11 May 2015 | Panel discussion
Norad’s international corruption hunters network meets in Bergen. Hear how they work to prosecute corrupt criminals.

Educating Afghan children: Blinded by numbers

8 May 2015
Access to education has been one of the main priorities for Afghan authorities and the international community for the past 14 years, but despite formidable investments in the country’s educational sector, many Afghan children leave school without being able to read or write. What has gone wrong?

How can Norway best support Afghanistan?

24 Mar 2015 | Afghanistan Week 2015:
The current situation in Afghanistan is the subject of two opposing narratives: one is a success story about international support and involvement since 2001; the other is a story where much has gone wrong and everything can only get worse. Agreeing on a narrative that is closer to the truth is crucial when deciding what form Norwegian support and involvement should take in the future, write Arne Strand and Liv Kjølseth.

Political Terror: How do we measure and deal with human insecurity?

16 Mar 2015 | The Chr. Michelsen lecture 2015
International human rights law promises to protect “everyone.” Yet, there is no country in the world where citizens enjoy the human rights protection promised to them by law. Professor Mark Gibney will speak to the importance of measuring political violence and how it has been carried out.

Rethinking inequalities in Latin America

6 Mar 2015
Several countries in Latin American has managed to reduce economic inequalities during the past decade. Yet, various forms of social, economic and cultural inequalities continues to be a defining feature of Latin American societies.

Can health systems 'travel'? How socio-political contexts are shaping health services in Africa

12 Feb 2015
This seminar is dedicated to the discussion of health systems in Africa as products of their social and political environment. With Jean Pierre Olivier de Sardan and Claire Wendland.

The dubious effects of economic growth

22 Dec 2014
Ethiopian women are flocking to the labour market making money of their own. Does this mean that there will be more gender equality? With a grant from the Research Council of Norway's scheme for Young Talented Researchers, CMI’s Lovise Aalen will lead a new project studying the impact of economic growth on the lives of women in developmental states.

Creating successful businesswomen

4 Dec 2014
A field experiment from Tanzania shows that female entrepreneurs have less success than their male counterparts even after training and provision of grants. Why is it so hard to succeed for women running small businesses, and what will it take to shift the tide?

Evaluationprize to CMI

29 Sep 2014
During the annual evaluation conference which was arranged by CMI in Bergen, the first Evaluationprize was announced. CMI and ITAD won the prize for an evaluation of Norwegian “Can We Demonstrate the Difference that Norwegian Aid Makes?”

José Eduardo Agualusa

19 Sep 2014 | African Authors
Join us in exploring the prize-winning Angolan author José Eduardo Agualusa's Africa, where the mundane and the fantastic, the tragic and the comic, fact and fiction merge in an artful mix of poetry, politics and personal confessions.

Following guidelines saves lives

28 Aug 2014
Pneumonia is the biggest child killer in developing countries. Simple medical procedures can improve diagnosis and save lives. Yet, studies show that many clinicians do not perform these procedures. Why?