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Policing Against Sexual Violence in Haiti

17 Oct 2016 | Breakfast Forum

2016 Bergen Exchanges on Law & Social Transformation

22 Aug 2016
The Bergen Exchanges on Law & Social Transformation is an annual interdisciplinary meeting place for scholars who want to understand the interplay between law and social change. The lectures, roundtables and panels bring together scholars and practitioners from all over the world. Welcome

Reduce judicial corruption and improve access to justice for all

26 Apr 2016
Corrupt judicial systems undermine reforms and are a major impediment to ensuring access to justice and human rights for ordinary citizens across the world, says a new report published by the United Nations Development Programme and U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre on 8 April. Titled, A Transparent and Accountable Judiciary to Deliver Justice for All, the report cites survey data suggesting that the public perceive the judiciary as the second most corrupt public institution, after the police.

Reality defeats good intentions: The power of religious leaders in Touba

27 Nov 2015
Legislation is a widely used tool for increasing the number of women in politics. But laws seeking to promote gender parity come short in facing the ‘sociological realities’ in Senegal, as the case of the holy city of Touba shows.

Seven months of war in the favela

13 Aug 2015 | CMI field notes
In the past, Brazilian intellectuals have coined the term “metaphor of war” to account for the representations of the crime and violence in Rio de Janeiro. The logic of war is at the very core of Rio’s pacification of the favelas, which in practice is carried out through armed confrontations between the police and armed groups within pacified favelas, where the main objective (on both sides), in spite of the rhetoric of peace, is still to kill the enemy.

Kindergardens and shootouts

6 Jul 2015 | Blogpost from Rocinha, Rio de Janeiro:
So far, kindergartens and shootouts have by and large been completely unrelated issues in my world. Not anymore. Now, for the past days, every morning around 7.30, I have slowed down and scouted cautiously: Does anyone seem tense, watchful? Are there any police troops in a state of mobilization hiding somewhere close? Are there any heavy fireworks all of a sudden, alerts of that something is about to happen?

Law and religious (un) freedom in the global era

18 Jun 2015
Is promoting "religious freedom" as a legally enforceable "right" the best guarantee for the free exercise of religion and for the accommodation of difference within deeply plural societies? This conference explores religion in and beyond law.

Violence against women in Afghanistan: Getting away with murder

19 May 2015
On 19 March, Farkhunda was lynched by an angry mob on the streets of Kabul. She had been falsely accused of burning the Quran. In a swift trial, four men were sentenced to death, eight to 16 years in prison. The Farkhunda trial is a statistical outlier. In Afghanistan, few men are punished for violence against women.

Covering up a massacre in Angola?

19 May 2015 | Will the international community take a stand?
In mid-April 2015, news emerged about the killing of nine police-men in Angola's Huambo province. The incident involved the police and members of Juliano Kalupeteca's "Light of the World" religious sect. In the following days, grizzling reports emerged of a massacre of perhaps hundreds of sect members. We do not yet know the truth. Angola's government appears to do its utmost to prevent knowledge of it to transpire. Will the international community remain passive?

Policing the Favelas: Reform, Rank, and Resistance in Rio’s Pacifying Police Units

24 Mar 2015 | Rio, March 2015
Felipe doesn’t like it much, shootouts occur almost every day, but he knows that he can’t show any signs of weakness, so he tries to keep up appearances. Two weeks after arriving at Fazendinha he was shot in a confrontation with armed traffickers.

How can Norway best support Afghanistan?

24 Mar 2015 | Afghanistan Week 2015:
The current situation in Afghanistan is the subject of two opposing narratives: one is a success story about international support and involvement since 2001; the other is a story where much has gone wrong and everything can only get worse. Agreeing on a narrative that is closer to the truth is crucial when deciding what form Norwegian support and involvement should take in the future, write Arne Strand and Liv Kjølseth.

IS: Who are the Western Recruits?

11 Feb 2015 | BreakfastForum
Yousuf Assidiq from Minotenk and Truls Tønnessen, FFI in conversation with Åse Gilje Østensen.

Civil-military relations in Venezuela…by the pool

27 Jan 2015 | CMI Field Notes
In Venezuela, views on the relationship between civilian politics and the military are highly divergent. Yet, at the pool club Circulo Militar el Lagunito all boundaries between civilians and the military are blurred. In this social club, anyone is welcome, no questions asked. The idea of civil-military alliances is at the core of CMI researcher Iselin Åsedotter Strønen's field work in Caracas.

Simón Bolívar- a man of war and a symbol of freedom

27 Mar 2014
During the recent revolution in Egypt, Simon Bolívar- a man from a different war, a different century and a different continent- was watched over and embraced by protestors as a symbol for their struggle. Why?

Didier Fassin: Humane, All Too Humane: Ethics and Politics of Humanitarianism

14 Mar 2014 | Chr. Michelsen lecture 2014
Humanitarianism has become a cosmopolitan language serving to qualify a broad diversity of actions, from aid to war, and of agents, either private or public. The lecture will propose an analysis of its ethical tensions and political predicaments.

Is Dos Santos pushing his luck?

19 Dec 2013
While the Angolan president José Eduardo Dos Santos may be grooming his son to follow him as president, political opponents of his regime have been eliminated. This year he has spent long periods of time abroad. Meanwhile, the social crisis in the country increases in scope. The opposition is organising their strengths. Even in the president's own ranks, there are murmurs of discontent. Has Dos Santos gone too far?

Can Ghana withstand the resource curse?

26 Nov 2013
Ghana discovered oil in 2010. The country now produces 100 000 barrels a day, amounting to an income of 1 billion dollars a year. Are the country's institutions strong enough to withstand the resource curse? -Yes, says Inge Amundsen, senior researcher at the Chr. Michelsen Institute.

Changing conditions for fighting economic crime

30 Oct 2013 | Workshop
What constitutes an efficient criminal justice system? This international workshop with leading experts explores criteria for crime-preventive impacts through the criminal justice system.

Democracy street

27 Jun 2013 | From Rio de Janeiro
How can we make our democracy truly representative? Can participation be institutionalized? And who does the Maracanã stadium belong to?

The military chooses the people

27 Jun 2013 | Egypt crisis
The Egyptian military has a long history of safeguarding the Egyptian people from oppressive regimes. As the Morsi-government fails to curb the economic decline and growing unemployment, the Egyptian people once again turn their attention to the military in hope of rescue.

What happens if Chávez dies? (And why do they love him so much?)

10 Dec 2012
Plaza Bolívar in the center of Caracas was filled with people today. Most people wore red t-shirts with images of the Chávez. A boy was sitting on his father´s shoulders, waiving with a doll of Chávez clad in military outfit.

Born in the USA

24 Oct 2012
This year, Professor Philippe Bourgois from the University of Pennsylvania was invited speaker at the Bergen Summer Research School (20-22 June), co-hosted by the CMI. During his visit, he was interviewed on his long-term research among drug-addicts in inner-city US ghettos. His research will be linked to a new program on urbanization and urbanity at CMI (Nefissa naguib and Are Knudsen).

Heading for trouble in Afghanistan

26 Sep 2012
With the support of NATO and the US, Afghan warlords are regaining strength. -The international community has chosen a dangerous path, warns researcher Akbar Sarwari.

"My Justice": The new role of warlords in Afghanistan

3 Sep 2012 | Seminar with Mohammad Akbar Sarwari

The polarisation to come

14 Aug 2012 | Angola Election 2012
On 31st of August voters in Angola will elect a new parliament and a president. It is already clear that the dice are loaded. Despite the low quality of the elections and the machinations of the incumbent - is Angola on the path to democracy?

Caught between rape and adultery

21 May 2012
Sudanese women activists launch reform initiatives to bring justice to rape victims. Non-governmental and governmental actors alike advocate for change. -International donors should seize this window of opportunity and facilitate dialogue between different stakeholders in Sudan, says CMI-researcher Liv Tønnessen.

Economic Uncertainty and Corruption

11 May 2012
Rajeev Goel will present a large cross-country dataset on the nexus between economic uncertainty and corruption. prevalence of corruption

Faith-based food justice

6 Jan 2012 | Nefissa Naguib blogs from Cairo:
Our faith drives us. We do our work with respect and humility. Our aim is to facilitate the distribution of food for every Egyptian who needs it, without discrimination between women or men, Muslim or Christian."

Troublesome peace

29 Sep 2011 | New report
The process of building peace and reintegrating insurgents in Afghanistan is failing. The political will isn't strong enough.

A choice between cancer and AIDS?

5 Jun 2011 | Election in Peru:
On June 5th, a new Peruvian president will be elected in a runoff between Ollanta Humala and Keiko Fujimori. The two candidates, for different reasons, raises concerns writes Camila Gianella.

Sorry for the inconvenience: Rebuilding Egypt

3 Feb 2011 | Nefissa Naguib blogs from Cairo:
Driven by solidarity and national pride, the Lotus Revolution pulled order out of chaos. By now the military chiefs know that citizens who took control of their lives and future will know how to do to it again.

Albie Sachs

15 Mar 2010 | Chr. Michelsen lecture:
Albie Sachs, Judge on the Constitutional Court of South Africa (1994-2009), and author of the book The Strange Alchemy of Life and Law, held this year's Chr. Michelsen lecture.

Crime, Poverty and Police Corruption in Developing Countries

23 Oct 2008 | CMI Seminar
Crime and the fear of being hit by crime and small-scale violence are key economic and social problems in most developing countries. How is police corruption linked to the wider processes of development - including crime, violence and poverty, asks Jens Chr. Andvig from NUPI and Odd-Helge Fjeldstad in this seminar.

Afghanistan : An Assessment of Conflict and Actors.

6 Mar 2007
The situation in Faryab, north Afghanistan is characterised by a substantial military and political uncertainty. Violent acts could at any moment hamper the humanitarian and development efforts. It is a great challenge to manage to balance this relation and at the same time assist in developing these governmental bodies to strengthen their professionalism and legitimacy.