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No magic bullets for reconciliation

17 Aug 2015 | Rwanda
When societies go from military dictatorship to democracy or from internal armed conflict to peace, one of the toughest choices facing the government in the new order is how to deal with past violence. Great hopes have been pinned on transitional justice mechanisms, but the anticipated positive effects of transitional justice mechanisms on the process of restoring peace or (re)constructing democracy may be too high.

Seven months of war in the favela

13 Aug 2015 | CMI field notes
In the past, Brazilian intellectuals have coined the term “metaphor of war” to account for the representations of the crime and violence in Rio de Janeiro. The logic of war is at the very core of Rio’s pacification of the favelas, which in practice is carried out through armed confrontations between the police and armed groups within pacified favelas, where the main objective (on both sides), in spite of the rhetoric of peace, is still to kill the enemy.

Violence against women in Afghanistan: Getting away with murder

19 May 2015
On 19 March, Farkhunda was lynched by an angry mob on the streets of Kabul. She had been falsely accused of burning the Quran. In a swift trial, four men were sentenced to death, eight to 16 years in prison. The Farkhunda trial is a statistical outlier. In Afghanistan, few men are punished for violence against women.

Covering up a massacre in Angola?

19 May 2015 | Will the international community take a stand?
In mid-April 2015, news emerged about the killing of nine police-men in Angola's Huambo province. The incident involved the police and members of Juliano Kalupeteca's "Light of the World" religious sect. In the following days, grizzling reports emerged of a massacre of perhaps hundreds of sect members. We do not yet know the truth. Angola's government appears to do its utmost to prevent knowledge of it to transpire. Will the international community remain passive?

Policing the Favelas: Reform, Rank, and Resistance in Rio’s Pacifying Police Units

24 Mar 2015 | Rio, March 2015
Felipe doesn’t like it much, shootouts occur almost every day, but he knows that he can’t show any signs of weakness, so he tries to keep up appearances. Two weeks after arriving at Fazendinha he was shot in a confrontation with armed traffickers.

Drone Wars

26 Sep 2014 | Breakfast forum
Pakistani lawyer Shahzad Akbad and former US drone pilot Brandon Bryant in conversation with Åse Gilje Østensen.

Monopoly of victimhood

28 Nov 2013
In Uganda, data suggests that not only women and girls are sexually assaulted in times of conflict and war, but also men and boys. Yet, male rape victims are almost invisible in interventions and even debates on conflict related sexual violence. Attention is overwhelmingly focused on girls and women. -There is a monopoly of victimhood, says Chris Dolan, Director at the Refugee Law Project at the School of Law, Makerere University.

The International Criminal Court: Global justice or unfair treatment of Africans?

27 Nov 2013 | BreakfastForum
Senior Researcher Gunnar M. Sørbø (CMI) and Professor of law Terje Einarsen (UiB) in conversation with Åse Gilje Østensen.

The basics of successful litigation

20 Sep 2013
"Litigation may be an effective means to secure economic, social and cultural rights," says Camila Gianella. As a result of numerous health rights litigations, the Colombian Constitutional Court ordered extensive structural reforms of the country's health system.

M. Cherif Bassiouni: International criminal justice in the era of growing globalization

30 May 2013 | Marking the 70th birthday of Astri Suhrke:
M. Cherif Bassiouni an international United Nations war crimes expert, often called "The Godfather of International Criminal Law". Professor Bassiouni has served in numerous United Nations positions, including Chair of the UN Independent International Commission of Inquiry for Libya (2011) and UN Commission on Human Rights for Afghanistan (2004-06).

Caught between rape and adultery

21 May 2012
Sudanese women activists launch reform initiatives to bring justice to rape victims. Non-governmental and governmental actors alike advocate for change. -International donors should seize this window of opportunity and facilitate dialogue between different stakeholders in Sudan, says CMI-researcher Liv Tønnessen.

Contesting women's rights in Sudan

30 Nov 2011
The Sudanese government rejects ratification of CEDAW, the UN Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women. They do this in the name of Islam.

Gendering the Nation

28 Oct 2011 | Seminar
Women endure violence in the everyday, in civil wars and conflicts, and in situations of political and religious oppression. Past or present, they find ways to survive. This seminar addresses a wide range of women's resilience strategies, rising questions of memory, trauma, silence and political mobilization to secure women's legal protection.

The politics of Africa's urban youth: Populism, music and anger

3 Oct 2011 | Seminar and panel debate
Poor and frustrated youth in African cities usually figure in the spotlight as violent and frightening elements during riots or elections. The seminar and panel debate will discuss music as a form of political expression originating from the youth themselves, and populist attempts of political parties to mobilise the urban youth. Are they victims of manipulation by unscrupulous politicians or agents of political change?

Sorry for the inconvenience: Rebuilding Egypt

3 Feb 2011 | Nefissa Naguib blogs from Cairo:
Driven by solidarity and national pride, the Lotus Revolution pulled order out of chaos. By now the military chiefs know that citizens who took control of their lives and future will know how to do to it again.

UNPAID DEBT: The Legacy of Lundin, Petronas and OMV in Sudan, 1997-2003

23 Jul 2010 | European Coalition on Oil in Sudan
With the report UNPAID DEBT, ECOS calls upon the oil companies Lundin Petroleum from Sweden, Petronas from Malaysia and Austria's OMV and their home governments to account for the injustices suffered by the victims of the oil wars in Block 5A.

Sudan's Comprehensive Peace Agreement viewed through the eyes of the Women of South Sudan

22 Jul 2010 | Fellows programme occasional paper 3 2010
Born in a territory between North and South Sudan, politically speaking the author is from the North. However, like many Sudanese women, the author feels that being a Sudanese woman is what is important for her. It is as a Sudanese woman that she feels she has the liberty to speak about Sudanese women - regardless of their political and geographic affiliations.

The War on Terror and the Terror of War

10 Sep 2008 | CMI Seminar
The War on Terror has induced wars that have destroyed countries, killed, maimed, and displaced vast numbers of innocent civilians in different parts of the world.

Roads to Reconciliation: Transitional Justice in Norway and Beyond

4 Sep 2008 | Human Rights Symposium
How do societies deal with gross human rights violations after the end of violent conflict? This symposium critically examines the justice and reconciliation processes by comparing the Norwegian post-World War II experience to more recent cases from Latin America, Africa and Asia.

Islam and Muslims in the West

15 Nov 2006
What does the new politics of security mean for Muslims? Associate Professor Michael Humphrey has published widely on the themes of ethnic identity, Islam, globalization, refugees, law, terrorism, war, human rights and reconciliation. His current research projects are concerned with atrocity, healing, national reconstruction and reconciliation.