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On the importance of solidarity and human rights work

8 Dec 2016 | Chair of the Rafto Board, Gunnar M. Sørbø:
Efforts to promote human rights are increasingly being challenged. Sadly, a number of new worries have emerged this year.

How to do accountability differently through the vertical integration of civil society advocacy and monitoring

21 Sep 2016
Despite the proliferation of civil society monitoring and advocacy initiatives, accountability failures are still persistent. Vertical integration provides a strategy for civil society initiatives to minimize the loopholes in their advocacy and monitoring which facilitate the perpetuation of corruption and inefficiency.

2016 Bergen Exchanges on Law & Social Transformation

22 Aug 2016
The Bergen Exchanges on Law & Social Transformation is an annual interdisciplinary meeting place for scholars who want to understand the interplay between law and social change. The lectures, roundtables and panels bring together scholars and practitioners from all over the world. Welcome

Senior Researcher (social anthropology)

15 Jun 2016 | Vacancy
CMI seeks an experienced social anthropologist who can strengthen the institute’s disciplinary, thematic and regional expertise, and is keen to work within thematically oriented, multi-disciplinary research teams.

Assisted return not a permanent solution for all asylum seekers

3 May 2016 | Blog post
Many asylum seekers who choose assisted return are from a country destroyed by war and conflict. More than half of those who return to countries such as Afghanistan and Iraq plan to migrate again. Assisted return is a viable type of support to assist with the return, but is not sufficient to prevent large numbers of people once again leaving insecure countries of return. Only minor changes are required, however, to increase the potential for permanent return.

Can REDD+ be corruption-free?

11 Dec 2015
Manipulating baseline forest data, double-counting project benefits, and skewing monitoring schemes have been known as likely corruption risks for REDD+. But how do these risks map onto the actual political economy of REDD+ implementation in selected pilot countries?

The way ahead for Tunisia

23 Oct 2015
Is Tunisia delivering on the promise of the Arab Spring by producing a real democracy?

Contested Powers: The Politics of Energy and Development in Latin America

8 Oct 2015 | Book Launch
The key to addressing climate change and sustainable development around the globe is to first address the relationship between political and financial power and energy use and resources. Meet the editors John-Andrew McNeish, Axel Borchgrevink and Owen Logan.

Education fees in Nepal give households a hard time

7 Oct 2015
During my fieldwork in Ilam district, Eastern Nepal, I had the chance to visit many different homes, and to experience parts of the everyday life of Nepali families. So far, in every single stay, I was impressed by the children’s motivation for doing homework until late in the evening, and their great ability to speak English. One of them, a 4,5-years old was copying mathematical rules and letters several times, “just for fun, as he is doing it every evening”, as his older brother told me.

Five things you need to know about the SDGs

25 Sep 2015
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been criticised for being too broad and vague. What are the chances of success?

No magic bullets for reconciliation

17 Aug 2015 | Rwanda
When societies go from military dictatorship to democracy or from internal armed conflict to peace, one of the toughest choices facing the government in the new order is how to deal with past violence. Great hopes have been pinned on transitional justice mechanisms, but the anticipated positive effects of transitional justice mechanisms on the process of restoring peace or (re)constructing democracy may be too high.

Kindergardens and shootouts

6 Jul 2015 | Blogpost from Rocinha, Rio de Janeiro:
So far, kindergartens and shootouts have by and large been completely unrelated issues in my world. Not anymore. Now, for the past days, every morning around 7.30, I have slowed down and scouted cautiously: Does anyone seem tense, watchful? Are there any police troops in a state of mobilization hiding somewhere close? Are there any heavy fireworks all of a sudden, alerts of that something is about to happen?

Violence against women in Afghanistan: Getting away with murder

19 May 2015
On 19 March, Farkhunda was lynched by an angry mob on the streets of Kabul. She had been falsely accused of burning the Quran. In a swift trial, four men were sentenced to death, eight to 16 years in prison. The Farkhunda trial is a statistical outlier. In Afghanistan, few men are punished for violence against women.

Covering up a massacre in Angola?

19 May 2015 | Will the international community take a stand?
In mid-April 2015, news emerged about the killing of nine police-men in Angola's Huambo province. The incident involved the police and members of Juliano Kalupeteca's "Light of the World" religious sect. In the following days, grizzling reports emerged of a massacre of perhaps hundreds of sect members. We do not yet know the truth. Angola's government appears to do its utmost to prevent knowledge of it to transpire. Will the international community remain passive?

The Iran-US nuclear agreement: Beginning of a new era?

6 May 2015
If the nuclear framework agreement is to be the start of something bigger, the US and other Western countries need a vision beyond the fight against terrorism, argues Walter Posch at the National Defence Academy in Vienna. Recognizing the role of energy security and economy in the region may be key to long-lasting change.

Civil-military relations in Venezuela…by the pool

27 Jan 2015 | CMI Field Notes
In Venezuela, views on the relationship between civilian politics and the military are highly divergent. Yet, at the pool club Circulo Militar el Lagunito all boundaries between civilians and the military are blurred. In this social club, anyone is welcome, no questions asked. The idea of civil-military alliances is at the core of CMI researcher Iselin Åsedotter Strønen's field work in Caracas.

Researching the social dynamics of law  

21 Aug 2014
Law is increasingly center stage for political battles. Across the globe, people are going to court to claim their right to health or education, to fight for their right to engage in sex work or same-sex relationships - while others mobilize courts and legislatures to criminalize prostitution or homosexual practice.

Reducing poverty: The role of labour markets

12 Jun 2014
Poverty is in decline in Nepal. Steady economic growth and labour migration is part of the explanation.

P4P: Good intentions can go wrong

30 May 2014
In an effort to improve maternal and child health, Tanzanian authorities implemented a pay for performance (P4P) scheme in 2009. The more women the health workers convinced to give birth at health facilities, the bigger bonus they would get. The number of women giving birth at health facilities did increase, but the new scheme also had adverse effects.

Correlates and likely causes for the decline in poverty in Nepal

23 May 2014
Poverty is declining in Nepal. What factors can explain the decline? What policies can lead to further improvements?

Promoting human rights in ever changing contexts

31 Mar 2014
Uganda's new anti-homosexuality law has disheartened the international human rights community. Would it have been possible to foresee Museveni's approval of the law? In an ideal world, actors promoting human rights can design projects and interventions and see them through with norms and laws in mind. In the real world, where politics and erratic decisions come into play, human rights work is extremely challenging.

Human rights in Latin American

31 Mar 2014 | New RCN projects
CMI has received funding for one new project on Latin American democratisation and peace processes and one project on abortion rights lawfare.

Protests on an empty stomach

25 Feb 2014
During the Egyptian uprisings against president Mubarak in 2011, people demanded bread, freedom and social justice. Bread is the daily staple for millions of Egyptians, and came to symbolize the demand for a fairer economic system. But does food insecurity necessarily cause social unrest and conflict?

Diversifying to avoid the resource curse?

20 Dec 2013
Diversification spreads risk as countries expand into new export sectors, but does diversification also improve institutions and address the resource curse? Diversification strategies were top of the agenda at the UNIDO General Conference in December.

Strengthening tax systems in developing countries

19 Dec 2013
How can donors strengthen tax systems in developing countries? By complementing their technical approach with measures to build a taxpayer culture, and challenging development countries to take the lead, says CMI researcher Odd-Helge Fjeldstad.

Is Dos Santos pushing his luck?

19 Dec 2013
While the Angolan president José Eduardo Dos Santos may be grooming his son to follow him as president, political opponents of his regime have been eliminated. This year he has spent long periods of time abroad. Meanwhile, the social crisis in the country increases in scope. The opposition is organising their strengths. Even in the president's own ranks, there are murmurs of discontent. Has Dos Santos gone too far?

Engaging with the public

28 Nov 2013
How can Supreme Audit Institutions engage and involve citizens at all stages of the audit cycle? This question was top of the agenda at the Open Government Partnership's Annual Summit in early November.

African perspectives on climate change governance

6 Nov 2013 | Let's be fair:
Africa is one of the most vulnerable continents to climate change. The poor are the most vulnerable to heat waves, sea level rise, the destruction of coastal zones, drought and water shortages. Is fair global interenational climate governance possible, asks Professor Oliver C. Ruppel.

Organizing their way to gender equality

25 Oct 2013
Ugandan women have organized themselves to the core of national politics. What lessons are there to learn from the Ugandan experience?

Ethiopia challenging Norwegian aid politics

30 Sep 2013
Ethiopian authorities are tightening the grip on political opponents, the Muslim minority and the media. Human Rights Watch describes the situation as alarming. The majority party in the soon to be Norwegian government has signaled cuts in aid to countries that do not respect human rights. Will they sacrifice Norwegian-Ethiopian relations on the altar of human rights?

The basics of successful litigation

20 Sep 2013
"Litigation may be an effective means to secure economic, social and cultural rights," says Camila Gianella. As a result of numerous health rights litigations, the Colombian Constitutional Court ordered extensive structural reforms of the country's health system.

Transforming Climate Change Governance

26 Aug 2013 | Roundtable

Include Southern voices in the new development agenda

15 Jul 2013
As the Millennium Development Goals are coming to an end, international actors have started working on a new set of development goals for the global community. Last time around, the majority of the inputs came from institutions in the North. Will the voice of Southern actors be heard this time?

-Make vaccination the default option

28 May 2013
There is huge variation in vaccination coverage across low- and middle-income countries. Some of the poorest countries perform far better than richer ones. The standard policy response to low coverage is to improve supply of vaccines. Researchers urge policymakers to also work on the demand side. - Health authorities should try making vaccination the default option, says CMI-director Ottar Mæstad.

Struggling Sudanese economy

29 Jan 2013
Political unrest and conflict, combined with failed strategies and policies, have led to a dramatic decline in foreign exchange revenues and foreign direct investments in Sudan. According to Hassan Ali Gadkarim, there is no miracle cure. The government of Sudan has to build lasting peace with its neighbours and establish accountable public institutions to win the foreign investors back.

What happens if Chávez dies? (And why do they love him so much?)

10 Dec 2012
Plaza Bolívar in the center of Caracas was filled with people today. Most people wore red t-shirts with images of the Chávez. A boy was sitting on his father´s shoulders, waiving with a doll of Chávez clad in military outfit.

CMI: Partner in Two New Centres of Excellence

12 Nov 2012
The Legitimate Role of the Judiciary in the Global Order at the University of Oslo and the Centre for Intervention Science in Maternal and Child Health at the University of Bergen have been granted Centre of Excellence. CMI are consortium partners.

Vietnam makes haste but not speed on anti-corruption

31 Oct 2012
Vietnam scores poorly on international measures of corruption. The Communist Party is trying to clean up public life, but progress is slow. Meanwhile, critique increases as corruption and rent-seeking impairs further economic growth.

FOOD AND FURY

16 Oct 2012
Food evokes emotions. Food shapes nations and cultures. Food can be a source of conflict. Food riots are one of the oldest forms of people's revolutions.

Addressing the knowledge-gap on anti-corruption interventions

25 Sep 2012
Corruption poses a serious threat to sustainable development and security. Donors spend large sums in support of interventions to reduce corruption and ensure that their funds are used for the intended purposes. Yet, despite these investments, the causes of corruption are better understood than how to most effectively reduce corruption.