Search in news

Corruption risk management: a smarter option for development aid

2 May 2016
A risk management strategy that can identify, assess and propose specific mitigation measures for corruption problems can help better address corruption. When done right, corruption risk management can contribute to increase development impacts.

Oil regimes on the verge of collapse

11 Mar 2016 | Breakfast Forum
When oil prices fell in 2014, Angola and Venezuela lost half of their income base. Crisis followed. Why has it been so hard for these countries to reform their political economies?

The best way to tax natural resources

24 Nov 2015
-A 'good' natural resource tax regime is one that does not undermine - or strangle - the development of the ordinary tax system, says CMI researcher Odd-Helge Fjeldstad. Different segments of the tax system 'interfere' with each other. If the most resourceful companies and individuals do not contribute with tax revenue due to tax avoidance and exemptions, this will affect the taxpaying behaviour of others.

Towards a common standard for development agencies’ integrity systems

9 Nov 2015
An eventual OECD integrity guideline for development agencies should emphasise communication around ethics regimes and control systems, assessment and management of corruption risks, and moving towards joint responses in donors’ integrity systems.

How stable is the Arab oil state?

3 Nov 2015
Michael Alvarez in conversatio with Kjetil Selvik and Bjørn Olav Utvik.

Education fees in Nepal give households a hard time

7 Oct 2015
During my fieldwork in Ilam district, Eastern Nepal, I had the chance to visit many different homes, and to experience parts of the everyday life of Nepali families. So far, in every single stay, I was impressed by the children’s motivation for doing homework until late in the evening, and their great ability to speak English. One of them, a 4,5-years old was copying mathematical rules and letters several times, “just for fun, as he is doing it every evening”, as his older brother told me.

Steps to limit the endemic corruption around junior mining companies

4 Oct 2015
High environmental risks and questionable development outcomes characterise the mining industry. A myriad of small companies operate in competitive, high-risk, high-reward settings with weak institutions that fail to enforce regulations. Such conditions are highly conducive to corruption, violence, and environmental destruction.

Stopping illegal trafficking of endangered species requires combatting corruption

3 Sep 2015
Corruption and illegal trafficking endanger the world’s biodiversity

No magic bullets for reconciliation

17 Aug 2015 | Rwanda
When societies go from military dictatorship to democracy or from internal armed conflict to peace, one of the toughest choices facing the government in the new order is how to deal with past violence. Great hopes have been pinned on transitional justice mechanisms, but the anticipated positive effects of transitional justice mechanisms on the process of restoring peace or (re)constructing democracy may be too high.

Law and religious (un) freedom in the global era

18 Jun 2015
Is promoting "religious freedom" as a legally enforceable "right" the best guarantee for the free exercise of religion and for the accommodation of difference within deeply plural societies? This conference explores religion in and beyond law.

Covering up a massacre in Angola?

19 May 2015 | Will the international community take a stand?
In mid-April 2015, news emerged about the killing of nine police-men in Angola's Huambo province. The incident involved the police and members of Juliano Kalupeteca's "Light of the World" religious sect. In the following days, grizzling reports emerged of a massacre of perhaps hundreds of sect members. We do not yet know the truth. Angola's government appears to do its utmost to prevent knowledge of it to transpire. Will the international community remain passive?

Educating Afghan children: Blinded by numbers

8 May 2015
Access to education has been one of the main priorities for Afghan authorities and the international community for the past 14 years, but despite formidable investments in the country’s educational sector, many Afghan children leave school without being able to read or write. What has gone wrong?

How can Norway best support Afghanistan?

24 Mar 2015 | Afghanistan Week 2015:
The current situation in Afghanistan is the subject of two opposing narratives: one is a success story about international support and involvement since 2001; the other is a story where much has gone wrong and everything can only get worse. Agreeing on a narrative that is closer to the truth is crucial when deciding what form Norwegian support and involvement should take in the future, write Arne Strand and Liv Kjølseth.

Pastoralism under stress

25 Sep 2014
The separation of Sudan and South Sudan has caused severe problems for the pastoralists living in the borderlands between the two nations. What used to be common land is now subject to border disputes and strict regulations, but cattle and goats do not respect international borders.

Researching the social dynamics of law  

21 Aug 2014
Law is increasingly center stage for political battles. Across the globe, people are going to court to claim their right to health or education, to fight for their right to engage in sex work or same-sex relationships - while others mobilize courts and legislatures to criminalize prostitution or homosexual practice.

P4P: Good intentions can go wrong

30 May 2014
In an effort to improve maternal and child health, Tanzanian authorities implemented a pay for performance (P4P) scheme in 2009. The more women the health workers convinced to give birth at health facilities, the bigger bonus they would get. The number of women giving birth at health facilities did increase, but the new scheme also had adverse effects.

Impossible to measure the effect of Norwegian aid

4 Apr 2014 | New study
Norwegian aid projects have not been designed or implemented in a way that makes it possible to evaluate them, concludes a recent study of the Norwegian Aid Administration.

Protests on an empty stomach

25 Feb 2014
During the Egyptian uprisings against president Mubarak in 2011, people demanded bread, freedom and social justice. Bread is the daily staple for millions of Egyptians, and came to symbolize the demand for a fairer economic system. But does food insecurity necessarily cause social unrest and conflict?

Rebuilding Angola

30 Jan 2014
Since 2002, the Angolan government has invested 55 billion dollars in rebuilding the country's infrastructure. Angola has also rebuilt the once bustling Benguela railway all the way from the port of Lobito to neighbouring countries of DR Congo and Zambia. -The efforts to rebuild and strengthen the transport sector are crucial to development and economic growth in Angola as well as for the region, says Ana Duarte and Regina Santos.

To pay or not to pay

28 Jan 2014
Taxpayer compliance in Sub-Saharan Africa is closely linked to peoples' views of the government's ability to deliver on important services, the fairness of the system, and consequences of tax evasion shows findings from the recent Afrobarometer survey.

Understanding Egypt: Soldiers, Revolutionaries and the People

20 Jan 2014 | Everyday Maneuvers presents:

Strengthening tax systems in developing countries

19 Dec 2013
How can donors strengthen tax systems in developing countries? By complementing their technical approach with measures to build a taxpayer culture, and challenging development countries to take the lead, says CMI researcher Odd-Helge Fjeldstad.

Can Ghana withstand the resource curse?

26 Nov 2013
Ghana discovered oil in 2010. The country now produces 100 000 barrels a day, amounting to an income of 1 billion dollars a year. Are the country's institutions strong enough to withstand the resource curse? -Yes, says Inge Amundsen, senior researcher at the Chr. Michelsen Institute.

African perspectives on climate change governance

6 Nov 2013 | Let's be fair:
Africa is one of the most vulnerable continents to climate change. The poor are the most vulnerable to heat waves, sea level rise, the destruction of coastal zones, drought and water shortages. Is fair global interenational climate governance possible, asks Professor Oliver C. Ruppel.

Here come the girls: Empowering young Tanzanian women

28 Oct 2013
In Tanzania, there is a striking increase in the number of girls who get pregnant from the ages 16 to 20. Among 16 year olds, 11 percent get pregnant, whereas 61 percent of the 20 year old girls start childbearing. Why do so many girls have babies when they are this young? How does this affect their economic situation and possibilities of entering the job market?

Democracy street

27 Jun 2013 | From Rio de Janeiro
How can we make our democracy truly representative? Can participation be institutionalized? And who does the Maracanã stadium belong to?

CSR in the Arab World: A mission impossible?

25 Feb 2013
CSR is on the rise in the Arab World, but the initiators find it difficult to root the concept beyond the ranks of state-owned enterprises and crony capitalists. - When CSR projects are initiated in Arab countries, they do not enter an empty void. Many businessmen have pre-existing conceptions of social responsibility, originated in Islam, says CMI-researcher Kjetil Selvik.

Struggling Sudanese economy

29 Jan 2013
Political unrest and conflict, combined with failed strategies and policies, have led to a dramatic decline in foreign exchange revenues and foreign direct investments in Sudan. According to Hassan Ali Gadkarim, there is no miracle cure. The government of Sudan has to build lasting peace with its neighbours and establish accountable public institutions to win the foreign investors back.

Christmas in a Caracas barrio

20 Dec 2012 | Blogging from Caracas
The streets, shops, metros and buses are congested like a school of mackerel in syrup by people out spending their December wages. It is high-volume Christmas preparations.

Iranian industry in limbo

26 Nov 2012
A thwarted industrial policy, poor economic governance and external tensions have brought Iran's industrial class to the brink of extinction. They are trapped in between the revolutionary rhetoric of the Islamic republic and unfulfilled attempts of economic pragmatism.

Facilitating small businesses: The Ethiopian experience

31 Oct 2012
The Ethiopian government has followed a top-down cluster development strategy by constructing working premises for small businesses. So far more than 2075 working premises have been built with a total cost of over 300 million birr. Why do most of the premises remain empty despite highly subsidized rent?

Building a taxpayer culture

4 Oct 2012 | Odd-Helge Fjeldstad's tax blog
The government's ability to collect taxes depends on people's and businesses' willingness to pay them. How do you convince them to pay their fair share?

Africa needs international tax regulations

17 Sep 2012
Developing countries could raise substantial domestic revenues by strengthening tax legislation and administration, but a lack of global regulations to address cross-border tax evasion is slowing down the process.

Assessing corruption risks critical for success of REDD

7 Sep 2012 | Op-ed
Learning the right lessons from past experiences with corruption in the forest sector is crucial to prevent broad undermining of REDD+.

Can corruption threaten REDD+?

29 Jun 2012
Norway has invested more money in the forest protection programme REDD+ than any other donor country. Corruption concerns have been widely raised when it comes to REDD+. Will Norwegian investments be in vain?

Africa loses big money on tax breaks

11 Jun 2012
Many African states could raise substantial tax revenues. Instead they race to offer foreign investors the most favorable tax treatment.

Breaking the landlords' hold on labourers

31 May 2012
The transition from a feudal to a modern economy has changed the labour market in Nepal. There are more and better paid jobs available, also outside the agricultural sector. Yet, some Nepalese labourers in rural areas continue to have coercive traditional contracts with landlords. Government programmes can help poor families out of these contracts through access to insurance, credit and social services.

Joining forces against corruption in Liberia

31 May 2012
A recent U4-workshop in Liberia has clarified obstacles and strengthened the cooperation on anti-corruption between donors, local and central authorities in Liberia. This paves the way for better donor support and government action, says U4-adviser Jesper Johnsøn.

Migration into resource-rich Gulf economies

3 May 2012 | Seminar
Halvor Mehlum and Gry Østenstad on the political economy of migration policies.

Economic growth does not eradicate undernourishment

26 Apr 2012
South Asia has gone through a period of strong economic growth the past two decades. GDP per capita has more than doubled over twenty years. Surprisingly, better economic conditions have not led to improved nutrition in South Asia. The number of undernourished children is almost at the same level today as it was twenty years ago.

The power of the masses

30 Mar 2012
Last year, discontent voters managed to get rid of Zambia's contested president Rupiah Banda. What is the success formula for overthrowing a regime based on electoral authoritarianism? Part of the answer lies in the urban masses.