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Is China too big to fault?

11 May 2016
In October 2010, Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel peace prize. New research from CMI shows that the Chinese sanctions had a substantial negative effect on Norwegian direct exports to China. In addition, an analysis of Norway’s voting pattern in the UN suggests that Chinese sanctions may have been effective in changing Norway’s position on human rights issues. The potential consequences are chilling.

Assisted return not a permanent solution for all asylum seekers

3 May 2016 | Blog post
Many asylum seekers who choose assisted return are from a country destroyed by war and conflict. More than half of those who return to countries such as Afghanistan and Iraq plan to migrate again. Assisted return is a viable type of support to assist with the return, but is not sufficient to prevent large numbers of people once again leaving insecure countries of return. Only minor changes are required, however, to increase the potential for permanent return.

Reduce judicial corruption and improve access to justice for all

26 Apr 2016
Corrupt judicial systems undermine reforms and are a major impediment to ensuring access to justice and human rights for ordinary citizens across the world, says a new report published by the United Nations Development Programme and U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre on 8 April. Titled, A Transparent and Accountable Judiciary to Deliver Justice for All, the report cites survey data suggesting that the public perceive the judiciary as the second most corrupt public institution, after the police.

Oil regimes on the verge of collapse

11 Mar 2016 | Breakfast Forum
When oil prices fell in 2014, Angola and Venezuela lost half of their income base. Crisis followed. Why has it been so hard for these countries to reform their political economies?

Can REDD+ be corruption-free?

11 Dec 2015
Manipulating baseline forest data, double-counting project benefits, and skewing monitoring schemes have been known as likely corruption risks for REDD+. But how do these risks map onto the actual political economy of REDD+ implementation in selected pilot countries?

Zeinab Abul-Magd won the Roger Owen Book Award

30 Nov 2015
The Everyday Maneuvers project member, Zeinab Abul-Magd (Oberlin College) won the prestigious biennial Roger Owen Book Award for Imagined Empires: A History of Revolt in Egypt (published by University of California Press). The announcement took place in Denver, Colorado at MESA’s (Middle East Studies Association) 2015 meeting. The winner of the award is the very best in economics, economic history, or the political economy of the Middle East and North Africa scholarship.

MESA 2015 -- Roger Owen Book Award announcement

22 Nov 2015
The Everyday Maneuvers project member, Zeinab Abul-Magd (Oberlin College) won the prestigious biennial Roger Owen Book Award for Imagined Empires: A History of Revolt in Egypt. The announcement took place in Denver, Colorado at MESA’s (Middle East Studies Association) 2015 meeting.

Angola’s Financial Sector: A Roundtable Report

30 Oct 2015
Angola's rapid economic growth over the last decade has been driven almost exclusively by the oil sector: 98% of Angola’s exports are linked to this sector. Yet, Angola has also seen explosive growth of its financial sector. Why has the Angolan financial sector grown so rapidly? How are Angola’s natural resource sector and its finance sector linked? How does Angola’s financial sector interface with the global economy?

How to prevent corruption in water management

24 Aug 2015
Corruption keeps people thirsty. It damages drinking supplies and sanitation and makes water inaccessible and unaffordable. Because dirty water can be deadly, cleaning up the water sector is a matter of life and death. Below is some advice for what donors can do to help prevent corruption in water management.

Magnificent and Beggar Land - Angola since the Civil War

22 May 2015 | Book launch
'We live in “an oligarch’s ideal world”. Western countries barely even pretend to disapprove of kleptocrats any more.’

Violence against women in Afghanistan: Getting away with murder

19 May 2015
On 19 March, Farkhunda was lynched by an angry mob on the streets of Kabul. She had been falsely accused of burning the Quran. In a swift trial, four men were sentenced to death, eight to 16 years in prison. The Farkhunda trial is a statistical outlier. In Afghanistan, few men are punished for violence against women.

The Iran-US nuclear agreement: Beginning of a new era?

6 May 2015
If the nuclear framework agreement is to be the start of something bigger, the US and other Western countries need a vision beyond the fight against terrorism, argues Walter Posch at the National Defence Academy in Vienna. Recognizing the role of energy security and economy in the region may be key to long-lasting change.

Multinational accounting firms: On both sides of the table

23 Jan 2015
Big accounting firms advice multinational companies on tax loopholes and lobby for tax exemptions. At the same time they advice governments in developing countries on tax reforms and engage in government task forces. A new research project delve deeper into the dual role of multinational accounting firms.

The dubious effects of economic growth

22 Dec 2014
Ethiopian women are flocking to the labour market making money of their own. Does this mean that there will be more gender equality? With a grant from the Research Council of Norway's scheme for Young Talented Researchers, CMI’s Lovise Aalen will lead a new project studying the impact of economic growth on the lives of women in developmental states.

Creating successful businesswomen

4 Dec 2014
A field experiment from Tanzania shows that female entrepreneurs have less success than their male counterparts even after training and provision of grants. Why is it so hard to succeed for women running small businesses, and what will it take to shift the tide?

African Transformation

29 Oct 2014 | Seminar
If African economies are to transform, they need more than growth - they need growth with depth.

A tale of three cities

29 Sep 2014
Maputo has been depicted as a ‘divided city’. How do the people living there imagine and engage with the city’s different urban spaces? A CMI research project, culminating in the film 'Maputo emergente. Visualising an African divided city' to be made by the Mozambican film-company ANIMA, explores this issue.

Angola and Norway - the perfect partnership? Business, politics and the challenge of human rights

23 Sep 2014 | The Angola Conference 2014
LIVE STREAMING NOW Angola is Norway's "biggest and most important economic partner in Africa" says the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Does Norway's activity in Angola contribute to Angola's stability and development over time?

Natural Resource Management: The importance of good policy makers

30 Jun 2014
- Policy makers and their decisions matter much more than a supposed resource curse, says Ricardo Soares de Oliveira. As East Africa booms with oil, he urges international actors and donors to repoliticise the international reform and financial agenda.

Reducing poverty: The role of labour markets

12 Jun 2014
Poverty is in decline in Nepal. Steady economic growth and labour migration is part of the explanation.

Rebuilding Somalia's Failed State: Alternative scenarios

8 May 2014
Is Somalia a failed state? Where can Somalia go from here and how can the country be rebuild?

Khartoum

20 Jan 2014
Khartoum remains an island of peace amidst armed conflict in many corners of the country.

Diversifying to avoid the resource curse?

20 Dec 2013
Diversification spreads risk as countries expand into new export sectors, but does diversification also improve institutions and address the resource curse? Diversification strategies were top of the agenda at the UNIDO General Conference in December.

New projects to CMI

28 Nov 2013
CMI has won a framework agreement with the Norwegian embassy in Tanzania to conduct 7-10 in-depth studies on aid, public finance, natural resources, land and agriculture, macroeconomics the next 4 years.

Four new projects for CMI

5 Nov 2013
CMI has got funding for four new research projects from the Research Council of Norway. The projects are all part of the NORGLOBAL programme.

Women, Power & Peacemaking in Africa

7 Oct 2013 | Seminar
Post-conflict countries in Africa have doubled the rates of female legislative representation compared with countries that have not undergone conflict. Professor Aili Mari Tripp compares changes in women's rights in Uganda, Liberia, Congo and Angola.

Ethiopia challenging Norwegian aid politics

30 Sep 2013
Ethiopian authorities are tightening the grip on political opponents, the Muslim minority and the media. Human Rights Watch describes the situation as alarming. The majority party in the soon to be Norwegian government has signaled cuts in aid to countries that do not respect human rights. Will they sacrifice Norwegian-Ethiopian relations on the altar of human rights?

When warm glow burns: Motivational (mis)allocation in the non-profit sector

27 Sep 2013 | CMISeminar
What are the links between NGO's finances, development workers' motivations and NGO's achievements?

Transforming Climate Change Governance

26 Aug 2013 | Roundtable

Include Southern voices in the new development agenda

15 Jul 2013
As the Millennium Development Goals are coming to an end, international actors have started working on a new set of development goals for the global community. Last time around, the majority of the inputs came from institutions in the North. Will the voice of Southern actors be heard this time?

The military chooses the people

27 Jun 2013 | Egypt crisis
The Egyptian military has a long history of safeguarding the Egyptian people from oppressive regimes. As the Morsi-government fails to curb the economic decline and growing unemployment, the Egyptian people once again turn their attention to the military in hope of rescue.

Arab Spring to Sudan?

25 Jun 2013 | From Khartoum:
There is an appetite for change. Discontent against Bashir is widespread. The popular sentiment rumbling in Khartoum is that Bashir will fall sooner or later.

Iran Election 2013

14 Jun 2013 | BreakfastForum

Dodging the health problems of the poor

30 May 2013
Less than 10 percent of money spent on health research is spent on diseases that primarily affect 90 percent of the world's population, including the poorest. Are even the meager 10 percent spent wisely? No, says Professor David Sanders and argues that a fear of stepping into the realm of politics makes global health actors and donors prioritise wrongly.

Overheating in the Kimberley: Theory and a case study

7 May 2013
Open lecture with Professor Thomas Hylland Eriksen (UiO) on the effects of an interconnected "overheated" world.

Struggling Sudanese economy

29 Jan 2013
Political unrest and conflict, combined with failed strategies and policies, have led to a dramatic decline in foreign exchange revenues and foreign direct investments in Sudan. According to Hassan Ali Gadkarim, there is no miracle cure. The government of Sudan has to build lasting peace with its neighbours and establish accountable public institutions to win the foreign investors back.

Emerging South powers in Africa: The West in retreat?

18 Dec 2012 | New book:
China, India, Brazil and South Africa have become major economic actors and players on the African continent. The role of the West and traditional development aid is rapidly changing. Has the emerging South powers' entry into the African continent changed the name of the game?

Angola: Growth, development & inequality - and what role for Norway?

4 Dec 2012 | Seminar
How is Angola transforming growth into development? How to balance benefits to Angola's citizens and foreign investors?

Iranian industry in limbo

26 Nov 2012
A thwarted industrial policy, poor economic governance and external tensions have brought Iran's industrial class to the brink of extinction. They are trapped in between the revolutionary rhetoric of the Islamic republic and unfulfilled attempts of economic pragmatism.

Vietnam makes haste but not speed on anti-corruption

31 Oct 2012
Vietnam scores poorly on international measures of corruption. The Communist Party is trying to clean up public life, but progress is slow. Meanwhile, critique increases as corruption and rent-seeking impairs further economic growth.

FOOD AND FURY

16 Oct 2012
Food evokes emotions. Food shapes nations and cultures. Food can be a source of conflict. Food riots are one of the oldest forms of people's revolutions.

Building a taxpayer culture

4 Oct 2012 | Odd-Helge Fjeldstad's tax blog
The government's ability to collect taxes depends on people's and businesses' willingness to pay them. How do you convince them to pay their fair share?

Africa needs international tax regulations

17 Sep 2012
Developing countries could raise substantial domestic revenues by strengthening tax legislation and administration, but a lack of global regulations to address cross-border tax evasion is slowing down the process.