Search in news

The best way to tax natural resources

24 Nov 2015
-A 'good' natural resource tax regime is one that does not undermine - or strangle - the development of the ordinary tax system, says CMI researcher Odd-Helge Fjeldstad. Different segments of the tax system 'interfere' with each other. If the most resourceful companies and individuals do not contribute with tax revenue due to tax avoidance and exemptions, this will affect the taxpaying behaviour of others.

Steps to limit the endemic corruption around junior mining companies

4 Oct 2015
High environmental risks and questionable development outcomes characterise the mining industry. A myriad of small companies operate in competitive, high-risk, high-reward settings with weak institutions that fail to enforce regulations. Such conditions are highly conducive to corruption, violence, and environmental destruction.

Key stakeholders gathered to discuss Tanzania’s future as a petro-state

27 Oct 2014
Close to 200 representatives from the government, academia, civil society and media were present when CMI, REPOA, and the National Bureau of Statistics presented their new research programme Tanzania as a future petro-state at the Hyatt Hotel in Dar es Salaam Friday 24 October.

Corruption, grabbing and development: Real world challenges

13 Feb 2014 | Book launch in Oslo
Grabbing is a major obstacle to development. It takes different forms in different countries, and standardised anti-corruption efforts fail. Experienced practitioners and researchers present corrupt practices from around the world challenging anti-corruption efforts and explaining why they have failed.

Strengthening tax systems in developing countries

19 Dec 2013
How can donors strengthen tax systems in developing countries? By complementing their technical approach with measures to build a taxpayer culture, and challenging development countries to take the lead, says CMI researcher Odd-Helge Fjeldstad.

Can Ghana withstand the resource curse?

26 Nov 2013
Ghana discovered oil in 2010. The country now produces 100 000 barrels a day, amounting to an income of 1 billion dollars a year. Are the country's institutions strong enough to withstand the resource curse? -Yes, says Inge Amundsen, senior researcher at the Chr. Michelsen Institute.

Struggling Sudanese economy

29 Jan 2013
Political unrest and conflict, combined with failed strategies and policies, have led to a dramatic decline in foreign exchange revenues and foreign direct investments in Sudan. According to Hassan Ali Gadkarim, there is no miracle cure. The government of Sudan has to build lasting peace with its neighbours and establish accountable public institutions to win the foreign investors back.

Vietnam makes haste but not speed on anti-corruption

31 Oct 2012
Vietnam scores poorly on international measures of corruption. The Communist Party is trying to clean up public life, but progress is slow. Meanwhile, critique increases as corruption and rent-seeking impairs further economic growth.

Building a taxpayer culture

4 Oct 2012 | Odd-Helge Fjeldstad's tax blog
The government's ability to collect taxes depends on people's and businesses' willingness to pay them. How do you convince them to pay their fair share?

Flammable societies?

24 Jan 2012
Despite the discovery of oil and gas, most countries rich in natural resources are still economically troubled and conflict-ridden. -Resources are not only tied to financial value, but also to social identity and cosmology. Current explanations of the resource curse fail to consider historical grievances and the significance of social territorialism, says John-Andrew McNeish in his newly published book Flammable Societies: Studies on the Socio-Economics of Oil and Gas.

Public Policies in Latin America: From Legal and Policy Commitments to Actual Participatory Processes

27 Oct 2010 | Mini Series on Latin America
Even if a formal commitment expressed in legal frameworks exists, participation is not always easy to implement, and not all societies are used to open spaces for a broader participation. Camilla Gianelli raise some questions regarding the risk of adopting participatory mechanisms as a recipe.

The Lost Peace. Collective Land Titling, Natural Resources and Armed Conflict in the Colombian Pacific

30 Sep 2010 | Latin America Seminar
What is the relationship between the change in the structure of land ownership and the dynamics of armed conflict in the Columbian Pacific, and how is it related to the planting and exploitation of palm oil?

Is Energy Nationalism a Problem in Latin America?

31 Aug 2010 | Debate
How do different models of ownership over natural resources affect poverty levels and social conflicts in Latin America? Who stand to gain and who stand to lose from nationalizing natural resources? And what do "natural resources" really mean for different groups in society?

New U4 Director

6 Apr 2010
CMI welcomes, Dr. Elizabeth (Liz) Hart, who is the new Director of the U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre (www.U4.no).

The Strange Alchemy of Life and Law

15 Mar 2010 | Literary Salon with Albie Sachs
Detained in solitary confinement, tortured, exiled and eventually blown up by a car bomb. From an early age Albie Sachs played a prominent part in the struggle for justice in South Africa.

From curse to development: Natural resources, institutions and public revenues

8 Sep 2009 | International conference:
The discovery of oil or mineral resources has been associated with devastating political conflict and economic setbacks insted of sustainable economic growth and poverty alleviation. The Oslo conference is aimed at eliciting lessons learned from recent efforts to improve the management of natural resources in developing countries.

When should companies exit a country where human rights are violated?

22 May 2006
A new CMI study "Should I stay or should I go!" will look into this question. When is it in the interest of a corporation to exit a repressive country? When do ethical considerations imply that a company should close down operations in a country?

Kristoffer Lidén: Debating the Political Architecture of Liberal Peacebuilding

13 Mar 2006
The major peacebuilding missions of the last 15 years have tried to build a liberal peace (liberal-democracy, free market economy and the protection of human rights) in war-torn developing countries. In accordance with liberal peace theory, these liberalisation efforts are expected to have a peace dividend both with regard to the domestic and the international relations of the host-country.