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Honduras slipping back into authoritarian rule

4 Mar 2016
Honduras has become one of the world’s most dangerous countries for activists. In the early hours of 3 March yet another prominent activist was murdered. Indigenous leader and human rights and environmental activist Bertha Cáceres was shot by unknown gunmen in her own house.

Businessmen in Arms: How the Military and Other Armed Groups Profit in the MENA Region

15 Feb 2016
Project member Zeinab Abul-Magd and Elke Grawert have edited a forthcoming book that examines the economic interests of armed actors in the Middle East and North Africa.

Protection of civilians: Why they die in US strikes

10 Nov 2015
The US military strike that devastated the MSF hospital in Kunduz in northern Afghanistan on 3 October generated profound, if short-lived, outrage in much of the world. The US government promised an investigation, and in late October appointed a military panel to do so. Yet its investigation is unlikely to address the more fundamental questions this attack raises: Why have US-airstrikes repeatedly produced catastrophic cases of “collateral damage” in Afghanistan?

Final conference and plans for 2016

5 Nov 2015
CMI held the third and final conference in the “Everyday Maneuvers” project and plans for a more intensive publication and project development workshop in 2016.

Everyday Maneuvers: Military-Civilian Relations in Latin America and the Middle East

30 Sep 2015 | Conference
Military-civilian relationships go to the heart of a nation's culture and politics. Dr. Hazem Kandil from Cambridge University discusses Military, Security, and Politics in Regime Change. Prof. Catherine Lutz from Brown University will explore Military Power in Social Context. There will also be panel debates and young scholars' corner.

Blurred lines: When the military becomes intertwined with civil society

17 Sep 2015
When general al-Sisi appeared wearing a suit for the first time, it caused public outrage among the middle class in Egypt. It also sparked immediate speculations of a presidential run. The suit became another symbol of the blurred lines between military and civilian relations.

No magic bullets for reconciliation

17 Aug 2015 | Rwanda
When societies go from military dictatorship to democracy or from internal armed conflict to peace, one of the toughest choices facing the government in the new order is how to deal with past violence. Great hopes have been pinned on transitional justice mechanisms, but the anticipated positive effects of transitional justice mechanisms on the process of restoring peace or (re)constructing democracy may be too high.

Seven months of war in the favela

13 Aug 2015 | CMI field notes
In the past, Brazilian intellectuals have coined the term “metaphor of war” to account for the representations of the crime and violence in Rio de Janeiro. The logic of war is at the very core of Rio’s pacification of the favelas, which in practice is carried out through armed confrontations between the police and armed groups within pacified favelas, where the main objective (on both sides), in spite of the rhetoric of peace, is still to kill the enemy.

Nefissa Naguib and Maria Celina D'Araujo will host a panel at the Congreso Internacional de Americanistas

12 Jul 2015 | Congreso Internacional de Americanistas
Nefissa Naguib and Maria Celina D'Araujo will host a panel on military-civilian interaction in Latin America at the annual Congreso Internacional de Americanistas

Covering up a massacre in Angola?

19 May 2015 | Will the international community take a stand?
In mid-April 2015, news emerged about the killing of nine police-men in Angola's Huambo province. The incident involved the police and members of Juliano Kalupeteca's "Light of the World" religious sect. In the following days, grizzling reports emerged of a massacre of perhaps hundreds of sect members. We do not yet know the truth. Angola's government appears to do its utmost to prevent knowledge of it to transpire. Will the international community remain passive?

The balancing act of moderate Islamist politics in Tunisia

12 May 2015 | CMI Field Notes
Discussions over the role Islam should play in public life, are raging in Tunisia. A veiled Tunisair flight attendant caused uproar in the Tunisian Parliament recently, writes researcher Mari Norbakk from fieldwork in Tunis.

Policing the Favelas: Reform, Rank, and Resistance in Rio’s Pacifying Police Units

24 Mar 2015 | Rio, March 2015
Felipe doesn’t like it much, shootouts occur almost every day, but he knows that he can’t show any signs of weakness, so he tries to keep up appearances. Two weeks after arriving at Fazendinha he was shot in a confrontation with armed traffickers.

How can Norway best support Afghanistan?

24 Mar 2015 | Afghanistan Week 2015:
The current situation in Afghanistan is the subject of two opposing narratives: one is a success story about international support and involvement since 2001; the other is a story where much has gone wrong and everything can only get worse. Agreeing on a narrative that is closer to the truth is crucial when deciding what form Norwegian support and involvement should take in the future, write Arne Strand and Liv Kjølseth.

Civil-military relations in Venezuela…by the pool

27 Jan 2015 | CMI Field Notes
In Venezuela, views on the relationship between civilian politics and the military are highly divergent. Yet, at the pool club Circulo Militar el Lagunito all boundaries between civilians and the military are blurred. In this social club, anyone is welcome, no questions asked. The idea of civil-military alliances is at the core of CMI researcher Iselin Åsedotter Strønen's field work in Caracas.

CMI researchers appointed to Afghanistan Review Commission

21 Nov 2014
The Norwegian government has appointed a committee that will evaluate Norway’s engagement in Afghanistan. The main objective is to review and draw lessons from the operation. Senior researchers Astri Suhrke and Torunn Wimpelmann at CMI will be part of the Commission.

Everyday Maneuvers workshop

10 Nov 2014
Everyday Maneuvers held a one-day workshop with CMI researcher and invited collaborative researchers Emma Jørum (Uppsala University), Annika Rabo (Stockholm University) and Heather McRobie (Oxford University). The main focus for the event was scholarly discussions about transitional justice in the Middle East, presentation of student projects, and planning forward.

Thailand: A Different Kind of Coup

2 Jun 2014 | Behind the News
The military has seized power under the banner of 'unity and harmony' to defend the constitutional monarchy. In the short term, they have won. In the longer run, the outcome is much less certain.

Simón Bolívar- a man of war and a symbol of freedom

27 Mar 2014
During the recent revolution in Egypt, Simon Bolívar- a man from a different war, a different century and a different continent- was watched over and embraced by protestors as a symbol for their struggle. Why?

Didier Fassin: Humane, All Too Humane: Ethics and Politics of Humanitarianism

14 Mar 2014 | Chr. Michelsen lecture 2014
Humanitarianism has become a cosmopolitan language serving to qualify a broad diversity of actions, from aid to war, and of agents, either private or public. The lecture will propose an analysis of its ethical tensions and political predicaments.

Security in public spaces

29 Jan 2014 | Breakfast Forum

Understanding Egypt: Soldiers, Revolutionaries and the People

20 Jan 2014 | Everyday Maneuvers presents:

Defying the international expert community in Afghanistan

20 Dec 2013
There has been much debate on whether Afghanistan's informal justice practices should be integrated in the country's official justice system. Who should decide such an issue? Local activists claiming that these practices violate human rights, international researchers arguing that they are an undeniable part of Afghan 'reality' or military actors claiming that informal justice is necessary to win the war against the insurgents?

Can Ghana withstand the resource curse?

26 Nov 2013
Ghana discovered oil in 2010. The country now produces 100 000 barrels a day, amounting to an income of 1 billion dollars a year. Are the country's institutions strong enough to withstand the resource curse? -Yes, says Inge Amundsen, senior researcher at the Chr. Michelsen Institute.

Waiting and Watching

10 Jul 2013 | From Cairo
People in Cairo are split these days. Some blame the army for conspiring against the Muslim Brotherhood in a coup; others on the other hand salute the army, and chant "The People and the Army are One Hand".

The military chooses the people

27 Jun 2013 | Egypt crisis
The Egyptian military has a long history of safeguarding the Egyptian people from oppressive regimes. As the Morsi-government fails to curb the economic decline and growing unemployment, the Egyptian people once again turn their attention to the military in hope of rescue.

Arab Spring to Sudan?

25 Jun 2013 | From Khartoum:
There is an appetite for change. Discontent against Bashir is widespread. The popular sentiment rumbling in Khartoum is that Bashir will fall sooner or later.

Afghan women's rights activists caught in a crossfire

30 Apr 2013
Afghan women's rights activists are caught in a squeeze between the expectations of Western donors, demands from Islamists and their own ambitions. Advocates fear rejection of all attempts to promote women's rights and are forced to make compromises.

When humanitarian action becomes politics

28 Feb 2013
The idea that you can incorporate humanitarian action into political agendas usually backfires, says Antonio Donini from the Feinstein International Center at Tufts University.

Navigating societies in transition

29 Jan 2013
How do military-civilian relations stamp societies in upheaval and conflict? What role do they play in the transition to democracy? A new CMI project on military-civilian relations compares Latin America and the Middle East.

New CMI project on Latin-America and the Middle East

18 Jan 2013
The Norwegian MFA has granted 11,567 million NOK for the next three years for a CMI research project on military-civilian relations in Latin-America and the Middle East.

What happens if Chávez dies? (And why do they love him so much?)

10 Dec 2012
Plaza Bolívar in the center of Caracas was filled with people today. Most people wore red t-shirts with images of the Chávez. A boy was sitting on his father´s shoulders, waiving with a doll of Chávez clad in military outfit.

Women make revolutions not tea

14 Oct 2012 | Liv Tønnessen blogs from Sudan:
For the first time in Sudanese history, 25% of the parliamentarians in the Assembly are women.

Heading for trouble in Afghanistan

26 Sep 2012
With the support of NATO and the US, Afghan warlords are regaining strength. -The international community has chosen a dangerous path, warns researcher Akbar Sarwari.

"My Justice": The new role of warlords in Afghanistan

3 Sep 2012 | Seminar with Mohammad Akbar Sarwari

Faith-based food justice

6 Jan 2012 | Nefissa Naguib blogs from Cairo:
Our faith drives us. We do our work with respect and humility. Our aim is to facilitate the distribution of food for every Egyptian who needs it, without discrimination between women or men, Muslim or Christian."

Strengthening Norwegian-Brazilian cooperation

15 Nov 2011
A new collaboration project between Chr. Michelsen Institute and the University of Brasilia strengthens the academic bonds between Norway and Brazil. The project aims to explore the role of armed forces in transitions to democracy.

Mass Media under Fire: Making Sense of State Attacks on the Media in Sub-Saharan Africa

27 Jun 2011 | CMI Seminar
Peter Von Doepp examines the direct effects of elections, military interventions, constitutional referenda, and food crises on government interference with private media outlets.

Democratic Renewal in Bangladesh

16 Jun 2011 | Seminar:
Democracy is fragile in Bangladesh. The new 2008 government promised change in politics and governance. Professor Rounaq Jahan, from the University of Colombia, explores the challenges faced by the new government.

Achieving Durable Peace: Afghan Perspectives on a Peace Process

27 May 2011 | CMI-PRIO Seminar in Oslo
Momentum continues to shift among international and Afghan actors towards a peace process in Afghanistan focusing on international and US strategy. Hamish Nixon presents findings from a large set of interviews with Afghan leaders and opinion-formers about their views on the conflict and the issues that a peace process will have to address.

Afghan leaders see need for US to make peace

27 May 2011 | With video: Hamish Nixon:
The Afghan conflict is driven by the impact and behaviour of international troops as well as the illegitimacy of the Afghan government.

Doing and Undoing Gender: African Voices Inside and Outside the Academy

19 May 2011 | Seminar
African states continue to undergo change and upheaval. While some struggle with authoritarian and military regimes, almost all, whether multi-party democracies or dictatorships, whether "free market" or socialist, have experienced "the failure of male-dominated" politics, says Akosua Adomako Ampofo.

Bernt Hagtvet in conversation with Elin Skaar on human rights in Latin America

13 Apr 2011 | Book salon
Elin Skaar's new book analyses the connections between transitional justice and judicial politics. She explores the role of courts in shaping options and trajectories of post-transitional justice - and concretely the chances of criminal prosecutions for past crimes in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay.

Politics and Transition in the New South Sudan

13 Apr 2011 | International Crisis Group report
Now that South Sudan's self-determination has been realised, long-suppressed grievances and simmering political disputes have re-surfaced, threatening instability on the eve of independence.

Sima Samar: Human Rights, Reintegration and Reconciliation in Afghanistan

15 Mar 2011 | The Christian Michelsen Lecture 2011
We need dialog and negotiation, but we also need accountability and justice. Dr. Sima Samar gives the 2011 Christian Michelsen lecture.