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Legislative Candidacy in Electoral Authoritarian Regimes. Evidence from Tanzania

26 Feb 2016
Authoritarian regimes is the most common regime type aside from democracy. In these settings, the ruling party permits opposition but stifles their chances to win. Why do individuals run for legislative office on opposition versus ruling party tickets in such regimes? asks Keith Weghorst, Post-doctoral fellow at Vanderbuilt University in this seminar.

Businessmen in Arms: How the Military and Other Armed Groups Profit in the MENA Region

15 Feb 2016
Project member Zeinab Abul-Magd and Elke Grawert have edited a forthcoming book that examines the economic interests of armed actors in the Middle East and North Africa.

Reality defeats good intentions: The power of religious leaders in Touba

27 Nov 2015
Legislation is a widely used tool for increasing the number of women in politics. But laws seeking to promote gender parity come short in facing the ‘sociological realities’ in Senegal, as the case of the holy city of Touba shows.

The best way to tax natural resources

24 Nov 2015
-A 'good' natural resource tax regime is one that does not undermine - or strangle - the development of the ordinary tax system, says CMI researcher Odd-Helge Fjeldstad. Different segments of the tax system 'interfere' with each other. If the most resourceful companies and individuals do not contribute with tax revenue due to tax avoidance and exemptions, this will affect the taxpaying behaviour of others.

Results Based Financing: The health system perspective

24 Nov 2015 | Regional workshop
Many experts see the introduction of results based financing (RBF) schemes as an opportunity to strengthen, or even reform, health systems; however, they are also a potential source of new risks and challenges that are not well understood.

Protection of civilians: Why they die in US strikes

10 Nov 2015
The US military strike that devastated the MSF hospital in Kunduz in northern Afghanistan on 3 October generated profound, if short-lived, outrage in much of the world. The US government promised an investigation, and in late October appointed a military panel to do so. Yet its investigation is unlikely to address the more fundamental questions this attack raises: Why have US-airstrikes repeatedly produced catastrophic cases of “collateral damage” in Afghanistan?

Steps to limit the endemic corruption around junior mining companies

4 Oct 2015
High environmental risks and questionable development outcomes characterise the mining industry. A myriad of small companies operate in competitive, high-risk, high-reward settings with weak institutions that fail to enforce regulations. Such conditions are highly conducive to corruption, violence, and environmental destruction.

The European Commission pledges to do more with development partners to tackle corruption

2 Oct 2015
The U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre´s call for more EU action to curb corruption in non-EU partner countries hit a European nerve.

Print media in Kuwait: Pluralism with a bias

25 Jun 2015
The number of newspapers in Kuwait has skyrocketed, but their owners are all closely affiliated to the political elite. Does this lead to a certain bias in the newspaper’s electoral coverage?

Violence against women in Afghanistan: Getting away with murder

19 May 2015
On 19 March, Farkhunda was lynched by an angry mob on the streets of Kabul. She had been falsely accused of burning the Quran. In a swift trial, four men were sentenced to death, eight to 16 years in prison. The Farkhunda trial is a statistical outlier. In Afghanistan, few men are punished for violence against women.

Covering up a massacre in Angola?

19 May 2015 | Will the international community take a stand?
In mid-April 2015, news emerged about the killing of nine police-men in Angola's Huambo province. The incident involved the police and members of Juliano Kalupeteca's "Light of the World" religious sect. In the following days, grizzling reports emerged of a massacre of perhaps hundreds of sect members. We do not yet know the truth. Angola's government appears to do its utmost to prevent knowledge of it to transpire. Will the international community remain passive?

Corruption hunters - investigating and prosecuting financial crime

11 May 2015 | Panel discussion
Norad’s international corruption hunters network meets in Bergen. Hear how they work to prosecute corrupt criminals.

How can Norway best support Afghanistan?

24 Mar 2015 | Afghanistan Week 2015:
The current situation in Afghanistan is the subject of two opposing narratives: one is a success story about international support and involvement since 2001; the other is a story where much has gone wrong and everything can only get worse. Agreeing on a narrative that is closer to the truth is crucial when deciding what form Norwegian support and involvement should take in the future, write Arne Strand and Liv Kjølseth.

Political Terror: How do we measure and deal with human insecurity?

16 Mar 2015 | The Chr. Michelsen lecture 2015
International human rights law promises to protect “everyone.” Yet, there is no country in the world where citizens enjoy the human rights protection promised to them by law. Professor Mark Gibney will speak to the importance of measuring political violence and how it has been carried out.

Playing the Ethnic Card? The political game in Malawi

4 Feb 2015 | CMI Field Notes
The good (but not so new) news from Malawian politics is that some of the democratic basics are in place, making the somewhat impaired democracy keep stumbling on, writes CMIs Inge Amundsen and Gift Sambo from the field.

Civil-military relations in Venezuela…by the pool

27 Jan 2015 | CMI Field Notes
In Venezuela, views on the relationship between civilian politics and the military are highly divergent. Yet, at the pool club Circulo Militar el Lagunito all boundaries between civilians and the military are blurred. In this social club, anyone is welcome, no questions asked. The idea of civil-military alliances is at the core of CMI researcher Iselin Åsedotter Strønen's field work in Caracas.

Regulating religion in secular Europe: Criminalizing religious practice?

12 Nov 2014 | BreakfastForum
Christine Jacobsen, SKOK, and Malcom Langford, CMI, in conversation with Åse Gilje Østensen.

Increasing local ownership, reducing administrative costs

27 Oct 2014
A new report concludes that Norwegian umbrella and network organisations are effective in building capacity in the South, but are cost-inefficient and have poor systems for monitoring and evaluations. Researchers recommend a channeling of more funds to funding mechanisms for civil society in the South rather than leaning on umbrella and network organisations in Norway.

New Director for U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre

29 Sep 2014
Boris Divjak started as Director of our U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre in September. He wants to reach even more practitioners from the development community.

A tale of three cities

29 Sep 2014
Maputo has been depicted as a ‘divided city’. How do the people living there imagine and engage with the city’s different urban spaces? A CMI research project, culminating in the film 'Maputo emergente. Visualising an African divided city' to be made by the Mozambican film-company ANIMA, explores this issue.

Pastoralism under stress

25 Sep 2014
The separation of Sudan and South Sudan has caused severe problems for the pastoralists living in the borderlands between the two nations. What used to be common land is now subject to border disputes and strict regulations, but cattle and goats do not respect international borders.

Reducing poverty: The role of labour markets

12 Jun 2014
Poverty is in decline in Nepal. Steady economic growth and labour migration is part of the explanation.

Non-food challenges to nutrition

6 Jun 2014 | Open lecture
How politics interfere with nutritional programs

Prosecutions, Politics and Transitions How criminal justice in the Arab Spring is shaping transitional justice

6 May 2014
This panel will address the question of the prosecution of political leaders in the Arab region, with a focus on four countries whose leaders were ousted during the Arab Spring uprisings: Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen.

Prosecuting leaders for universal crimes before domestic courts

23 Apr 2014
Public event with Naomi Roht-Arriaza (University of California), Elin Skaar (CMI) and Harmen van der Wilt (University of Amsterdam).

To pay or not to pay

28 Jan 2014
Taxpayer compliance in Sub-Saharan Africa is closely linked to peoples' views of the government's ability to deliver on important services, the fairness of the system, and consequences of tax evasion shows findings from the recent Afrobarometer survey.

Strengthening human rights in Ethiopia

28 Jan 2014
Ethiopia has great success in its work to eradicate poverty. Yet, the human rights situation in the country makes cooperation a challenging task for the international community. Norway should support the country´s human rights work by strengthening Ethiopia's internal debates on human rights, says CMI-researchers. -The best way to do this is through institutional cooperation, and close collaboration with Ethiopian partners.

Defying the international expert community in Afghanistan

20 Dec 2013
There has been much debate on whether Afghanistan's informal justice practices should be integrated in the country's official justice system. Who should decide such an issue? Local activists claiming that these practices violate human rights, international researchers arguing that they are an undeniable part of Afghan 'reality' or military actors claiming that informal justice is necessary to win the war against the insurgents?

Diversification or privatisation? Governance in the "Wild East" of Angola

30 Oct 2013
Rich in diamonds, yet abundant in poverty, Mathias de Alencastro looks at Angola's state-building efforts in the diamond-rich province of Luanda.

Organizing their way to gender equality

25 Oct 2013
Ugandan women have organized themselves to the core of national politics. What lessons are there to learn from the Ugandan experience?

When warm glow burns: Motivational (mis)allocation in the non-profit sector

27 Sep 2013 | CMISeminar
What are the links between NGO's finances, development workers' motivations and NGO's achievements?

Arab Spring to Sudan?

25 Jun 2013 | From Khartoum:
There is an appetite for change. Discontent against Bashir is widespread. The popular sentiment rumbling in Khartoum is that Bashir will fall sooner or later.

African leadership for African development

18 Jun 2013
Is aid helping or hurting Africa? Pete Ondeng urges for empowerment of people.

Dodging the health problems of the poor

30 May 2013
Less than 10 percent of money spent on health research is spent on diseases that primarily affect 90 percent of the world's population, including the poorest. Are even the meager 10 percent spent wisely? No, says Professor David Sanders and argues that a fear of stepping into the realm of politics makes global health actors and donors prioritise wrongly.

Struggling Sudanese economy

29 Jan 2013
Political unrest and conflict, combined with failed strategies and policies, have led to a dramatic decline in foreign exchange revenues and foreign direct investments in Sudan. According to Hassan Ali Gadkarim, there is no miracle cure. The government of Sudan has to build lasting peace with its neighbours and establish accountable public institutions to win the foreign investors back.

Emerging South powers in Africa: The West in retreat?

18 Dec 2012 | New book:
China, India, Brazil and South Africa have become major economic actors and players on the African continent. The role of the West and traditional development aid is rapidly changing. Has the emerging South powers' entry into the African continent changed the name of the game?

What happens if Chávez dies? (And why do they love him so much?)

10 Dec 2012
Plaza Bolívar in the center of Caracas was filled with people today. Most people wore red t-shirts with images of the Chávez. A boy was sitting on his father´s shoulders, waiving with a doll of Chávez clad in military outfit.

Iranian industry in limbo

26 Nov 2012
A thwarted industrial policy, poor economic governance and external tensions have brought Iran's industrial class to the brink of extinction. They are trapped in between the revolutionary rhetoric of the Islamic republic and unfulfilled attempts of economic pragmatism.

Born in the USA

24 Oct 2012
This year, Professor Philippe Bourgois from the University of Pennsylvania was invited speaker at the Bergen Summer Research School (20-22 June), co-hosted by the CMI. During his visit, he was interviewed on his long-term research among drug-addicts in inner-city US ghettos. His research will be linked to a new program on urbanization and urbanity at CMI (Nefissa naguib and Are Knudsen).

Caught between rape and adultery

21 May 2012
Sudanese women activists launch reform initiatives to bring justice to rape victims. Non-governmental and governmental actors alike advocate for change. -International donors should seize this window of opportunity and facilitate dialogue between different stakeholders in Sudan, says CMI-researcher Liv Tønnessen.

De brune konvoluttene. Misbruk av bistandsmidler?

7 May 2012
Lansering av rapporten "Hunting for Per Diem: The Uses and Abuses of Travel Compensation in Three Developing Countries".

Migration into resource-rich Gulf economies

3 May 2012 | Seminar
Halvor Mehlum and Gry Østenstad on the political economy of migration policies.

Hunting for per diems

23 Apr 2012
Allowances, or per diems, have become an important source of income for civil servants in sub-saharan Africa. -Existing practices need to be revised, says CMI-researcher Tina Søreide.

The Christian Michelsen lecture 2012: Sendhil Mullainathan: Poor thinking

15 Mar 2012 | The Christian Michelsen lecture 2012
What are the irrational choices we make that perpetuate poverty, corruption, discrimination?