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Colombia: A peace that will last?

9 Dec 2016 | Nobel Peace Prize
Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos managed to secure approval for the new peace agreement between the government and FARC before he comes to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize on December 10.

On the importance of solidarity and human rights work

8 Dec 2016 | Chair of the Rafto Board, Gunnar M. Sørbø:
Efforts to promote human rights are increasingly being challenged. Sadly, a number of new worries have emerged this year.

Reduce judicial corruption and improve access to justice for all

26 Apr 2016
Corrupt judicial systems undermine reforms and are a major impediment to ensuring access to justice and human rights for ordinary citizens across the world, says a new report published by the United Nations Development Programme and U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre on 8 April. Titled, A Transparent and Accountable Judiciary to Deliver Justice for All, the report cites survey data suggesting that the public perceive the judiciary as the second most corrupt public institution, after the police.

Kindergardens and shootouts

6 Jul 2015 | Blogpost from Rocinha, Rio de Janeiro:
So far, kindergartens and shootouts have by and large been completely unrelated issues in my world. Not anymore. Now, for the past days, every morning around 7.30, I have slowed down and scouted cautiously: Does anyone seem tense, watchful? Are there any police troops in a state of mobilization hiding somewhere close? Are there any heavy fireworks all of a sudden, alerts of that something is about to happen?

Violence against women in Afghanistan: Getting away with murder

19 May 2015
On 19 March, Farkhunda was lynched by an angry mob on the streets of Kabul. She had been falsely accused of burning the Quran. In a swift trial, four men were sentenced to death, eight to 16 years in prison. The Farkhunda trial is a statistical outlier. In Afghanistan, few men are punished for violence against women.

Covering up a massacre in Angola?

19 May 2015 | Will the international community take a stand?
In mid-April 2015, news emerged about the killing of nine police-men in Angola's Huambo province. The incident involved the police and members of Juliano Kalupeteca's "Light of the World" religious sect. In the following days, grizzling reports emerged of a massacre of perhaps hundreds of sect members. We do not yet know the truth. Angola's government appears to do its utmost to prevent knowledge of it to transpire. Will the international community remain passive?

Researching the social dynamics of law  

21 Aug 2014
Law is increasingly center stage for political battles. Across the globe, people are going to court to claim their right to health or education, to fight for their right to engage in sex work or same-sex relationships - while others mobilize courts and legislatures to criminalize prostitution or homosexual practice.

Changing conditions for fighting economic crime

30 Oct 2013 | Workshop
What constitutes an efficient criminal justice system? This international workshop with leading experts explores criteria for crime-preventive impacts through the criminal justice system.

#Egypt: Mursi: Blogged out of office?

15 Oct 2013 | BreakfastForum
Kareem Amer (ICORN guest writer in Bergen) and Mari Nybakk (CMI-student) in conversation with Åse Gilje Østensen about social media and the current political scene in Egypt.

Waiting and Watching

10 Jul 2013 | From Cairo
People in Cairo are split these days. Some blame the army for conspiring against the Muslim Brotherhood in a coup; others on the other hand salute the army, and chant "The People and the Army are One Hand".

Afghan women's rights activists caught in a crossfire

30 Apr 2013
Afghan women's rights activists are caught in a squeeze between the expectations of Western donors, demands from Islamists and their own ambitions. Advocates fear rejection of all attempts to promote women's rights and are forced to make compromises.

Born in the USA

24 Oct 2012
This year, Professor Philippe Bourgois from the University of Pennsylvania was invited speaker at the Bergen Summer Research School (20-22 June), co-hosted by the CMI. During his visit, he was interviewed on his long-term research among drug-addicts in inner-city US ghettos. His research will be linked to a new program on urbanization and urbanity at CMI (Nefissa naguib and Are Knudsen).

Litigating their way to better health

2 Nov 2011
Litigating health rights does make a difference. However, it varies to whom. Court cases brought by NGOs often contribute to better health care for the poor. Other cases primarily benefit middle class people who have resources to go to court.

Deborah Brautingam: China in challenged democracies in Africa

12 May 2011 | Video:
There is economic growth in Africa. This is partly attributed to China's presence and economic investments in many African countries. What political challenges threatens democratization in Sub Saharan Africa and why?

The Politics of Exile in Latin America

3 Jun 2010 | CMI Seminar
Exile has been present in Latin America since colonial times. After independence from Spain and Portugal, Latin American nation states have actively used exile as a regulatory political mechanism preferable to prison or execution, in dealing with opposition that various governments have been unable to assimilate into their political systems.

Albie Sachs

15 Mar 2010 | Chr. Michelsen lecture:
Albie Sachs, Judge on the Constitutional Court of South Africa (1994-2009), and author of the book The Strange Alchemy of Life and Law, held this year's Chr. Michelsen lecture.

Human Rights Forum

21 Feb 2006
Karin Ask: " Engendering of female rights in Afghanistan - Theorizing the local/global interface" Sindre Bangstad: "Islam Imprisoned: Transformations in Religious and Human Rights for Muslim Prisoners in a Prison in Cape Town, South Africa 1994-2004"