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Protection of civilians: Why they die in US strikes

10 Nov 2015
The US military strike that devastated the MSF hospital in Kunduz in northern Afghanistan on 3 October generated profound, if short-lived, outrage in much of the world. The US government promised an investigation, and in late October appointed a military panel to do so. Yet its investigation is unlikely to address the more fundamental questions this attack raises: Why have US-airstrikes repeatedly produced catastrophic cases of “collateral damage” in Afghanistan?

Steps to limit the endemic corruption around junior mining companies

4 Oct 2015
High environmental risks and questionable development outcomes characterise the mining industry. A myriad of small companies operate in competitive, high-risk, high-reward settings with weak institutions that fail to enforce regulations. Such conditions are highly conducive to corruption, violence, and environmental destruction.

Five things you need to know about the SDGs

25 Sep 2015
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been criticised for being too broad and vague. What are the chances of success?

Stopping illegal trafficking of endangered species requires combatting corruption

3 Sep 2015
Corruption and illegal trafficking endanger the world’s biodiversity

Law and religious (un) freedom in the global era

18 Jun 2015
Is promoting "religious freedom" as a legally enforceable "right" the best guarantee for the free exercise of religion and for the accommodation of difference within deeply plural societies? This conference explores religion in and beyond law.

Violence against women in Afghanistan: Getting away with murder

19 May 2015
On 19 March, Farkhunda was lynched by an angry mob on the streets of Kabul. She had been falsely accused of burning the Quran. In a swift trial, four men were sentenced to death, eight to 16 years in prison. The Farkhunda trial is a statistical outlier. In Afghanistan, few men are punished for violence against women.

The balancing act of moderate Islamist politics in Tunisia

12 May 2015 | CMI Field Notes
Discussions over the role Islam should play in public life, are raging in Tunisia. A veiled Tunisair flight attendant caused uproar in the Tunisian Parliament recently, writes researcher Mari Norbakk from fieldwork in Tunis.

Political Terror: How do we measure and deal with human insecurity?

16 Mar 2015 | The Chr. Michelsen lecture 2015
International human rights law promises to protect “everyone.” Yet, there is no country in the world where citizens enjoy the human rights protection promised to them by law. Professor Mark Gibney will speak to the importance of measuring political violence and how it has been carried out.

Protecting Civilians in Refugee Camps

22 May 2014
Rather than serving as civilian and humanitarian safe havens, refugee camps are notorious for their insecurity. When a violation occurs, to which actors shall responsibility be allocated?

Promoting human rights in ever changing contexts

31 Mar 2014
Uganda's new anti-homosexuality law has disheartened the international human rights community. Would it have been possible to foresee Museveni's approval of the law? In an ideal world, actors promoting human rights can design projects and interventions and see them through with norms and laws in mind. In the real world, where politics and erratic decisions come into play, human rights work is extremely challenging.

Security in public spaces

29 Jan 2014 | Breakfast Forum

To pay or not to pay

28 Jan 2014
Taxpayer compliance in Sub-Saharan Africa is closely linked to peoples' views of the government's ability to deliver on important services, the fairness of the system, and consequences of tax evasion shows findings from the recent Afrobarometer survey.

Monopoly of victimhood

28 Nov 2013
In Uganda, data suggests that not only women and girls are sexually assaulted in times of conflict and war, but also men and boys. Yet, male rape victims are almost invisible in interventions and even debates on conflict related sexual violence. Attention is overwhelmingly focused on girls and women. -There is a monopoly of victimhood, says Chris Dolan, Director at the Refugee Law Project at the School of Law, Makerere University.

African perspectives on climate change governance

6 Nov 2013 | Let's be fair:
Africa is one of the most vulnerable continents to climate change. The poor are the most vulnerable to heat waves, sea level rise, the destruction of coastal zones, drought and water shortages. Is fair global interenational climate governance possible, asks Professor Oliver C. Ruppel.

Changing conditions for fighting economic crime

30 Oct 2013 | Workshop
What constitutes an efficient criminal justice system? This international workshop with leading experts explores criteria for crime-preventive impacts through the criminal justice system.

Land Rights and Inclusive Development in India

17 Oct 2013
Why has landlessness come to plague the weakest and poorest amongst the tribal population, when laws were enacted to prevent this from happening?

The military chooses the people

27 Jun 2013 | Egypt crisis
The Egyptian military has a long history of safeguarding the Egyptian people from oppressive regimes. As the Morsi-government fails to curb the economic decline and growing unemployment, the Egyptian people once again turn their attention to the military in hope of rescue.

Afghan women's rights activists caught in a crossfire

30 Apr 2013
Afghan women's rights activists are caught in a squeeze between the expectations of Western donors, demands from Islamists and their own ambitions. Advocates fear rejection of all attempts to promote women's rights and are forced to make compromises.

CSR in the Arab World: A mission impossible?

25 Feb 2013
CSR is on the rise in the Arab World, but the initiators find it difficult to root the concept beyond the ranks of state-owned enterprises and crony capitalists. - When CSR projects are initiated in Arab countries, they do not enter an empty void. Many businessmen have pre-existing conceptions of social responsibility, originated in Islam, says CMI-researcher Kjetil Selvik.

Emerging South powers in Africa: The West in retreat?

18 Dec 2012 | New book:
China, India, Brazil and South Africa have become major economic actors and players on the African continent. The role of the West and traditional development aid is rapidly changing. Has the emerging South powers' entry into the African continent changed the name of the game?

Five RCN-projects to CMI

14 Dec 2012
Five research projects from CMI were granted funding from the Research Council of Norway last week.

Iranian industry in limbo

26 Nov 2012
A thwarted industrial policy, poor economic governance and external tensions have brought Iran's industrial class to the brink of extinction. They are trapped in between the revolutionary rhetoric of the Islamic republic and unfulfilled attempts of economic pragmatism.

"My Justice": The new role of warlords in Afghanistan

3 Sep 2012 | Seminar with Mohammad Akbar Sarwari

Can corruption threaten REDD+?

29 Jun 2012
Norway has invested more money in the forest protection programme REDD+ than any other donor country. Corruption concerns have been widely raised when it comes to REDD+. Will Norwegian investments be in vain?

Constitutional protection of social rights: Comparative perspectives

8 May 2012 | CMI/UoB seminar
Roberto Gargarella, Octavio Ferraz, Sudhir Krishnaswamy, Jayna Kothari, Anneken Sperr and Henriette Sinding Larsen compare and discuss research from Latin-America, India, Norway and Germany.

The Christian Michelsen lecture 2012: Sendhil Mullainathan: Poor thinking

15 Mar 2012 | The Christian Michelsen lecture 2012
What are the irrational choices we make that perpetuate poverty, corruption, discrimination?

Breakfast Forum: The Malawi Slippage - From democracy to autocracy

14 Mar 2012 | Breakfast Forum
Frøy Gudbrandsen (UiB) in conversation with Malawi activist Rafiq Hajat and Arne Tostensen (CMI)

Flammable societies?

24 Jan 2012
Despite the discovery of oil and gas, most countries rich in natural resources are still economically troubled and conflict-ridden. -Resources are not only tied to financial value, but also to social identity and cosmology. Current explanations of the resource curse fail to consider historical grievances and the significance of social territorialism, says John-Andrew McNeish in his newly published book Flammable Societies: Studies on the Socio-Economics of Oil and Gas.

The complexity of religious domination

10 Jan 2012
In Jordan, churches and mosques are situated side by side. In Sudan, religious minorities can hold powerful positions, but rarely do. Religious domination is not a question of black or white.

Faith-based food justice

6 Jan 2012 | Nefissa Naguib blogs from Cairo:
Our faith drives us. We do our work with respect and humility. Our aim is to facilitate the distribution of food for every Egyptian who needs it, without discrimination between women or men, Muslim or Christian."

Contesting women's rights in Sudan

30 Nov 2011
The Sudanese government rejects ratification of CEDAW, the UN Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women. They do this in the name of Islam.

Gendering the Nation

28 Oct 2011 | Seminar
Women endure violence in the everyday, in civil wars and conflicts, and in situations of political and religious oppression. Past or present, they find ways to survive. This seminar addresses a wide range of women's resilience strategies, rising questions of memory, trauma, silence and political mobilization to secure women's legal protection.

Latin American and African Perspectives

24 Jun 2011 | Seminar Gender Justice and Legal Pluralities:
Anne Hellum and Rachel Sieder share perspectives, experiences and thoughts on gender justice and legal pluralities in Africa and Latin America based on long-term fieldworks and extensive scholarship on the subject.

Egypt´s military chiefs get connected

2 Mar 2011 | Nefissa Naguib comments on Egypt
Questions are raised about the intentions of the Egyptian armed forces and if they will stretch to meet the people´s demands. Voices in the international community are concerned. With good reason.

Sorry for the inconvenience: Rebuilding Egypt

3 Feb 2011 | Nefissa Naguib blogs from Cairo:
Driven by solidarity and national pride, the Lotus Revolution pulled order out of chaos. By now the military chiefs know that citizens who took control of their lives and future will know how to do to it again.

City limits: Urbanisation and vulnerability in Sudan

3 Feb 2011 | ODI Case Study
The rapid expansion of Sudan's towns and cities confronts humanitarian and development agencies with new and complex challenges.

The Virtual Museum: Connecting the Humanities, Visual Technologies and Community Development

8 Dec 2010 | Seminar
What opportunities do virtual museums create for dialog between diverse communities? How can virtual museums contribute to a development paradigm that moves beyond enduring conceptions of aid as a one-way transaction? How can digital media positively augment these processes?

Institutionalizing Protection for Internally Displaced Persons

6 Dec 2010 | Seminar
This half-day seminar discusses refugees and legal protection in countries in Africa, in Colombia and in Palestine. Professor César Rodríguez-Garavito from the University of the Andes discusses with scholars from the University of Bergen and CMI.

Gen Salva Kiir Mayardit public address

13 Oct 2010 | Public speech
Read the public address of Gen Salva Kiir Mayardit on his return from the official visit to the United States of America.

Unwilling and Unable: The Failed Response to the Atrocities in Darfur

10 Sep 2010 | Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect
This report from the Global Centre for The Responsibility to Protect examines the entire sequence of events in Darfur and asks, first, why the world manifestly failed to stem the violence, and, secondly, what ought to have been done in the face of a state apparently determined to perpetrate atrocities upon its own people.

Sudan's Comprehensive Peace Agreement viewed through the eyes of the Women of South Sudan

22 Jul 2010 | Fellows programme occasional paper 3 2010
Born in a territory between North and South Sudan, politically speaking the author is from the North. However, like many Sudanese women, the author feels that being a Sudanese woman is what is important for her. It is as a Sudanese woman that she feels she has the liberty to speak about Sudanese women - regardless of their political and geographic affiliations.

LRA: A Regional Strategy beyond Killing Kony

25 Jun 2010 | International Crisis Group - New Report
Nairobi/Brussels, 28 April 2010: To make an end of the brutal Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) once and for all, national armies, the UN and civilians need to pool intelligence and coordinate their efforts in new and creative ways.

Guatemala: Violence and Insecurity after the Peace

19 May 2010 | Seminar in Oslo:
The aim of this seminar is to take stock of the situation in Guatemala regarding poverty, security and indigenous rights and analyze the root causes of the disappointing developments following the signing of the peace accords in 1996.