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How to do accountability differently through the vertical integration of civil society advocacy and monitoring

21 Sep 2016
Despite the proliferation of civil society monitoring and advocacy initiatives, accountability failures are still persistent. Vertical integration provides a strategy for civil society initiatives to minimize the loopholes in their advocacy and monitoring which facilitate the perpetuation of corruption and inefficiency.

INDNOR Workshop

30 Aug 2016

Shared Prosperity

15 Mar 2016 | The Chr. Michelsen lecture 2016: Kaushik Basu
Kaushik Basu is an Indian economist and academic who is Senior Vice-President and Chief Economist of the World Bank. In the Chr. Michelsen lecture he will discuss the normative properties of shared prosperity and the implications for actual policymaking, especially in the presence of globalization.

Leveraging open government for engaging citizens and improving transparency

25 Jan 2016
A series of case studies on the implementation of Open Government Partnership (OGP) reforms found that civil society participation fosters successful implementation, and that the limited capacity of local governments and civil society actors can be an obstacle for reform. Political commitment and strong coordination at the country level also improve the implementation record of OGP National Action Plans.

Best article prize

11 Jun 2015
CMI researcher Magnus Hatlebakk has received the Dudley Seers Memorial Prize for the best article in Journal of Development Studies in 2014.

Educating Afghan children: Blinded by numbers

8 May 2015
Access to education has been one of the main priorities for Afghan authorities and the international community for the past 14 years, but despite formidable investments in the country’s educational sector, many Afghan children leave school without being able to read or write. What has gone wrong?

How can Norway best support Afghanistan?

24 Mar 2015 | Afghanistan Week 2015:
The current situation in Afghanistan is the subject of two opposing narratives: one is a success story about international support and involvement since 2001; the other is a story where much has gone wrong and everything can only get worse. Agreeing on a narrative that is closer to the truth is crucial when deciding what form Norwegian support and involvement should take in the future, write Arne Strand and Liv Kjølseth.

Following guidelines saves lives

28 Aug 2014
Pneumonia is the biggest child killer in developing countries. Simple medical procedures can improve diagnosis and save lives. Yet, studies show that many clinicians do not perform these procedures. Why?

Girls need career possibilities

28 Aug 2014
Family planning policies have been implemented around the world for decades, but with limited results. This is also the case in Tanzania where school dropout is a big problem and the majority of girls get pregnant by the age of 20. What are they doing wrong?

How to convince nurses to work in rural areas

30 Jun 2014
Tanzanian nurses are reluctant to work in rural areas. - Offering further education and free housing may convince many more to move to remote areas, says CMI director Ottar Mæstad.

Reducing poverty: The role of labour markets

12 Jun 2014
Poverty is in decline in Nepal. Steady economic growth and labour migration is part of the explanation.

Thailand: A Different Kind of Coup

2 Jun 2014 | Behind the News
The military has seized power under the banner of 'unity and harmony' to defend the constitutional monarchy. In the short term, they have won. In the longer run, the outcome is much less certain.

Correlates and likely causes for the decline in poverty in Nepal

23 May 2014
Poverty is declining in Nepal. What factors can explain the decline? What policies can lead to further improvements?

Bergen Seminar in Development Economics

8 May 2014
Robert Lensink (Groningen) and Carol Newman (Dublin) are visiting CMI for the spring Bergen seminar in development economics. There will be papers on son-preference in South-Asia, technology transfers and foreign investments in Vietnam, the role of IMF for foreign aid flows, and on financial literacy in rural Rwanda.

Rebuilding Angola

30 Jan 2014
Since 2002, the Angolan government has invested 55 billion dollars in rebuilding the country's infrastructure. Angola has also rebuilt the once bustling Benguela railway all the way from the port of Lobito to neighbouring countries of DR Congo and Zambia. -The efforts to rebuild and strengthen the transport sector are crucial to development and economic growth in Angola as well as for the region, says Ana Duarte and Regina Santos.

Here come the girls: Empowering young Tanzanian women

28 Oct 2013
In Tanzania, there is a striking increase in the number of girls who get pregnant from the ages 16 to 20. Among 16 year olds, 11 percent get pregnant, whereas 61 percent of the 20 year old girls start childbearing. Why do so many girls have babies when they are this young? How does this affect their economic situation and possibilities of entering the job market?

Ethiopia challenging Norwegian aid politics

30 Sep 2013
Ethiopian authorities are tightening the grip on political opponents, the Muslim minority and the media. Human Rights Watch describes the situation as alarming. The majority party in the soon to be Norwegian government has signaled cuts in aid to countries that do not respect human rights. Will they sacrifice Norwegian-Ethiopian relations on the altar of human rights?

Five RCN-projects to CMI

14 Dec 2012
Five research projects from CMI were granted funding from the Research Council of Norway last week.

The polarisation to come

14 Aug 2012 | Angola Election 2012
On 31st of August voters in Angola will elect a new parliament and a president. It is already clear that the dice are loaded. Despite the low quality of the elections and the machinations of the incumbent - is Angola on the path to democracy?

Breaking the landlords' hold on labourers

31 May 2012
The transition from a feudal to a modern economy has changed the labour market in Nepal. There are more and better paid jobs available, also outside the agricultural sector. Yet, some Nepalese labourers in rural areas continue to have coercive traditional contracts with landlords. Government programmes can help poor families out of these contracts through access to insurance, credit and social services.

The power of the masses

30 Mar 2012
Last year, discontent voters managed to get rid of Zambia's contested president Rupiah Banda. What is the success formula for overthrowing a regime based on electoral authoritarianism? Part of the answer lies in the urban masses.

Defining poverty from below

27 Feb 2012
A social class of ultra poor is becoming increasingly visible in Mozambique. Neither national authorities nor international donors are able to target them with their current poverty reduction policies.

What is there to learn from Hugo Chavez?

26 Jan 2012
During the past decade, Venezuela has used revenue from the oil sector to reduce poverty and foster social development. Questions of social inequalities are high up on the political agenda, says Iselin Åsedotter Strønen.

A woman's world

16 Dec 2011
An increasing number of poor women in Namibian shantytowns form their own households and female social networks. Men are not part of their family coping strategies.

Poor motivation compromises health care

24 Oct 2011
Poorly motivated Tanzanian health workers could pose a threat to patients. Simple procedures like counting childrens' respiratory rate can save lives, but are often left out. However, changes are achievable within the existing work force.

Low motivation gives poor quality health care

23 Sep 2011 | Doctoral dissertation defence
Low health worker performance is a key obstacle to achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals. While a lack of knowledge, equipment and medicine have been seen as the major challenges, a recent study pinpoints poorly motivated health workers as an important contributing factor to low quality health care in low-income settings.

Rural Economic Organisation

26 May 2011 | CMI Seminar:
Professor Clive Bell of Heidelberg University has since the 1970s made seminal contributions to our understanding of formal and informal contracts and interactions between powerful landowners and moneylenders in poor rural economies and their tenants. He will, nearly 40 years later, give an overview of where this sub-field of development economics stands today.

Bergen Seminar in Development Economics

25 May 2011
In the biannual Bergen Seminar in Development Economics, Professor Clive Bell of Heidelberg University, will talk about a rural roads program in India. Professor Basanta Pradhan of IEG-Delhi will discuss transfers from the central government to the states of India. There will also be two papers on entrepreneurial success, by Professor Mirjam van Praag from University of Amsterdam and Ivar Kolstad, CMI.

Archaeology, Exclusion and Conflict in Jerusalem: Silwan and the City of David

9 May 2011 | Seminar:
The manipulation of archaeology to rationalize exclusive nationalist and ethnic claims of primacy persist. Bert de Vriers presents the case of the creation of the City of David as an archaeological park by the Elad settler organization in the mostly Palestinian community of Silwan.

City limits: Urbanisation and vulnerability in Sudan

3 Feb 2011 | ODI Case Study
The rapid expansion of Sudan's towns and cities confronts humanitarian and development agencies with new and complex challenges.

The Development of Local Governance in Rural Nepal

13 Dec 2010 | Seminar
Through the last fifty years Nepal has gone from a strong monarchy, via a parliamentarian constitutional monarchy, followed by a Maoist insurgency and revival of monarchic rule, to a multiparty (soon federal) republic. Annelies Ollieuz will present som findings from her fieldwork in a village near Biratnagar, in many ways the birthplace of modern democracy in Nepal.

Public Policies in Latin America: From Legal and Policy Commitments to Actual Participatory Processes

27 Oct 2010 | Mini Series on Latin America
Even if a formal commitment expressed in legal frameworks exists, participation is not always easy to implement, and not all societies are used to open spaces for a broader participation. Camilla Gianelli raise some questions regarding the risk of adopting participatory mechanisms as a recipe.

Fuelling Development

14 Apr 2010 | Seminar in the Resource Centre
The drive to find alternative domestic sources of energy is intense in India. Biofuel is seen as a possibility - offering a source of fuel, reclaiming degraded land as well as generating ncome for the rural poor. Does it? Clare Tompsett discusses.

Land and Law

27 Nov 2007 | New Human Rights Project
In Africa and Latin America the conditions of rights to land are commonly characterised by ambiguous rules and norms that are intimately connected to the construction and inequality of both national and local social structures and ethnic and religious identities.

Social Relations of Rural Poverty in Mozambique

20 Dec 2006
CMI presents the first report in a series of three qualitative studies on poverty in Mozambique. The study looks into people's own emic perceptions of poverty, and offers a host of policy implications.

Afghanistan: Humanitarian and Reconstruction Assistance 2001-05

31 Oct 2005
"Without a functioning justice system, rebuilding a state after a conflict will not succeed. Without the foundation of the rule of law, it is impossible to secure all other nation-building processes" concludes Arne Strand who has just completed a major multidonor evaluation of humanitarian and reconstruction assistance to Afghanistan 2001-2005.