Search in news

Defying the international expert community in Afghanistan

20 Dec 2013
There has been much debate on whether Afghanistan's informal justice practices should be integrated in the country's official justice system. Who should decide such an issue? Local activists claiming that these practices violate human rights, international researchers arguing that they are an undeniable part of Afghan 'reality' or military actors claiming that informal justice is necessary to win the war against the insurgents?

Is Dos Santos pushing his luck?

19 Dec 2013
While the Angolan president José Eduardo Dos Santos may be grooming his son to follow him as president, political opponents of his regime have been eliminated. This year he has spent long periods of time abroad. Meanwhile, the social crisis in the country increases in scope. The opposition is organising their strengths. Even in the president's own ranks, there are murmurs of discontent. Has Dos Santos gone too far?

Monopoly of victimhood

28 Nov 2013
In Uganda, data suggests that not only women and girls are sexually assaulted in times of conflict and war, but also men and boys. Yet, male rape victims are almost invisible in interventions and even debates on conflict related sexual violence. Attention is overwhelmingly focused on girls and women. -There is a monopoly of victimhood, says Chris Dolan, Director at the Refugee Law Project at the School of Law, Makerere University.

New projects to CMI

28 Nov 2013
CMI has won a framework agreement with the Norwegian embassy in Tanzania to conduct 7-10 in-depth studies on aid, public finance, natural resources, land and agriculture, macroeconomics the next 4 years.

The International Criminal Court: Global justice or unfair treatment of Africans?

27 Nov 2013 | BreakfastForum
Senior Researcher Gunnar M. Sørbø (CMI) and Professor of law Terje Einarsen (UiB) in conversation with Åse Gilje Østensen.

African perspectives on climate change governance

6 Nov 2013 | Let's be fair:
Africa is one of the most vulnerable continents to climate change. The poor are the most vulnerable to heat waves, sea level rise, the destruction of coastal zones, drought and water shortages. Is fair global interenational climate governance possible, asks Professor Oliver C. Ruppel.

Four new projects for CMI

5 Nov 2013
CMI has got funding for four new research projects from the Research Council of Norway. The projects are all part of the NORGLOBAL programme.

Changing conditions for fighting economic crime

30 Oct 2013 | Workshop
What constitutes an efficient criminal justice system? This international workshop with leading experts explores criteria for crime-preventive impacts through the criminal justice system.

Here come the girls: Empowering young Tanzanian women

28 Oct 2013
In Tanzania, there is a striking increase in the number of girls who get pregnant from the ages 16 to 20. Among 16 year olds, 11 percent get pregnant, whereas 61 percent of the 20 year old girls start childbearing. Why do so many girls have babies when they are this young? How does this affect their economic situation and possibilities of entering the job market?

Organizing their way to gender equality

25 Oct 2013
Ugandan women have organized themselves to the core of national politics. What lessons are there to learn from the Ugandan experience?

Land Rights and Inclusive Development in India

17 Oct 2013
Why has landlessness come to plague the weakest and poorest amongst the tribal population, when laws were enacted to prevent this from happening?

Women, Power & Peacemaking in Africa

7 Oct 2013 | Seminar
Post-conflict countries in Africa have doubled the rates of female legislative representation compared with countries that have not undergone conflict. Professor Aili Mari Tripp compares changes in women's rights in Uganda, Liberia, Congo and Angola.

Judicial Battlefield over the Right to Abortion in Latin America

30 Sep 2013 | BreakfastForum
Paola Bergallo and Rachel Sieder in conversation with Åse Gilje Østensen.

Ethiopia challenging Norwegian aid politics

30 Sep 2013
Ethiopian authorities are tightening the grip on political opponents, the Muslim minority and the media. Human Rights Watch describes the situation as alarming. The majority party in the soon to be Norwegian government has signaled cuts in aid to countries that do not respect human rights. Will they sacrifice Norwegian-Ethiopian relations on the altar of human rights?

The basics of successful litigation

20 Sep 2013
"Litigation may be an effective means to secure economic, social and cultural rights," says Camila Gianella. As a result of numerous health rights litigations, the Colombian Constitutional Court ordered extensive structural reforms of the country's health system.

Waiting and Watching

10 Jul 2013 | From Cairo
People in Cairo are split these days. Some blame the army for conspiring against the Muslim Brotherhood in a coup; others on the other hand salute the army, and chant "The People and the Army are One Hand".

There is no fuel!

1 Jul 2013 | From Cairo
It is no longer the Egyptian people against the current regime. The people have split into two fronts, opposing each other as pro- and anti-Morsi. People, who expect violence, expect it to arise from clashes between the groups, not between the security forces and the people...

Democracy street

27 Jun 2013 | From Rio de Janeiro
How can we make our democracy truly representative? Can participation be institutionalized? And who does the Maracanã stadium belong to?

Arab Spring to Sudan?

25 Jun 2013 | From Khartoum:
There is an appetite for change. Discontent against Bashir is widespread. The popular sentiment rumbling in Khartoum is that Bashir will fall sooner or later.

Norwegian aid is wasted

21 Jun 2013
Or isn't it? Do aid efforts to reduce child mortality actually work? Do projects aimed at female empowerment lead to less violence against women?

Iran Election 2013

14 Jun 2013 | BreakfastForum

M. Cherif Bassiouni: International criminal justice in the era of growing globalization

30 May 2013 | Marking the 70th birthday of Astri Suhrke:
M. Cherif Bassiouni an international United Nations war crimes expert, often called "The Godfather of International Criminal Law". Professor Bassiouni has served in numerous United Nations positions, including Chair of the UN Independent International Commission of Inquiry for Libya (2011) and UN Commission on Human Rights for Afghanistan (2004-06).

Elections for what? The role of ballots in North Africa's political transitions

8 May 2013
The importance of electoral institutions is growing in North Africa as a consequence of the 2011 Arab uprisings. Four international specialists discuss the lessons of the recent electoral experiences. Have elections resulted in new forms of authoritarianism or are they harbingers of genuine democratic transitions?

Afghan women's rights activists caught in a crossfire

30 Apr 2013
Afghan women's rights activists are caught in a squeeze between the expectations of Western donors, demands from Islamists and their own ambitions. Advocates fear rejection of all attempts to promote women's rights and are forced to make compromises.

Women's battles outside the Western feminist tradition

22 Mar 2013
The late Hugo Chavez proclaimed himself a feminist and opened up new arenas for women's activism in Venezuela. Poor women challenged their traditional roles as mothers and wives and took a collective step into the public sphere. Yet, their struggle is not so much about women's liberation from a Western feminist perspective as it is a fight for alleviating poverty and opening up new spaces for women's political participation.

New blog on women's rights

8 Mar 2013
This year, Norway celebrates 100 years of women's suffrage. We mark this occasion with a brand new blog "Now me: on women's rights".

When humanitarian action becomes politics

28 Feb 2013
The idea that you can incorporate humanitarian action into political agendas usually backfires, says Antonio Donini from the Feinstein International Center at Tufts University.

CSR in the Arab World: A mission impossible?

25 Feb 2013
CSR is on the rise in the Arab World, but the initiators find it difficult to root the concept beyond the ranks of state-owned enterprises and crony capitalists. - When CSR projects are initiated in Arab countries, they do not enter an empty void. Many businessmen have pre-existing conceptions of social responsibility, originated in Islam, says CMI-researcher Kjetil Selvik.

When numbers speak volumes

28 Jan 2013
The unique collection has made the library at the Bergen Resource Centre for International Development the most popular specialized library in Norway. In 2011, more than 5000 volumes were on loan all over the country. -The collection is an invaluable resource to researchers and policymakers, says Carol Priestley.

Christmas in a Caracas barrio

20 Dec 2012 | Blogging from Caracas
The streets, shops, metros and buses are congested like a school of mackerel in syrup by people out spending their December wages. It is high-volume Christmas preparations.

My right

18 Dec 2012 | Blogging from Cairo
The Egyptians are voting yes or no to their new constitution. Where are the fingerprints of Egyptian women?

Five RCN-projects to CMI

14 Dec 2012
Five research projects from CMI were granted funding from the Research Council of Norway last week.

What happens if Chávez dies? (And why do they love him so much?)

10 Dec 2012
Plaza Bolívar in the center of Caracas was filled with people today. Most people wore red t-shirts with images of the Chávez. A boy was sitting on his father´s shoulders, waiving with a doll of Chávez clad in military outfit.

Women in the market: Equal opportunities?

28 Nov 2012
A field experiment from Tanzania shows that business training improves sales and profit figures for men, but has no effect for women's business performance. -Promoting development among female entrepreneurs is challenging and needs comprehensive measures. We need to pay more attention to the external constraints that limit their possibilities, says Bertil Tungodden.

Facilitating small businesses: The Ethiopian experience

31 Oct 2012
The Ethiopian government has followed a top-down cluster development strategy by constructing working premises for small businesses. So far more than 2075 working premises have been built with a total cost of over 300 million birr. Why do most of the premises remain empty despite highly subsidized rent?