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U4 Brief | Aug 2019

‘Kenyapowerless’ – Corruption as 'Problem Solving' in Kenya's Periphery

Rising demand for electricity in the Kenyan periphery has created opportunities for corruption. Decentralised solar electricity exists, but those running a business from home using modern appliances need more energy....
Festus Boamah, David Aled Williams (2019)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Brief 2019:1)
U4 Issue | Jun 2019

China and global integrity-building: Challenges and prospects for engagement

Due to its economic weight and an increasingly active outreach towards developing countries under the framework of "South-South Cooperation", the People's Republic of China's (PRC) global footprint has become such...
Bertram Lang (2019)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2019:7)
U4 Issue | May 2019

Comparing peer-based anti-corruption missions in Kosovo and Guatemala

International missions brought foreign experts to help local partners tackle corruption and organised crime in Kosovo and Guatemala. With unprecedented investigative powers, those efforts sought to disrupt criminal networks and...
Gabriel Kuris (2019)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2019:6)
U4 Issue | Apr 2019

Education sector corruption: How to assess it and ways to address it

Education sector corruption erodes social trust, worsens inequality, and sabotages development. Types of corruption in elementary-secondary education range from academic cheating to bribery and nepotism in teaching appointments to bid-rigging...
Monica Kirya (2019)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2019:5)
U4 Issue | Apr 2019

Beyond the work permit quotas. Corruption and other barriers to labour integration for Syrian refugees in Jordan

In 2016, the Jordanian government began issuing work permits for Syrian refugees through the Ministry of Labor and cooperating labour associations. Despite its successes on some fronts, reliance on intermediaries...
Sarah Tobin, Maisam Alahmed (2019)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2019:4)
U4 Issue | Feb 2019

Follow the integrity trendsetter. How to support change in youth opinion and build social trust

In some societies people come to see corruption as the norm. When popular opinion in a country normalises corruption, this results in low trust in public administration. In Nepal, a...
Jenny Bentley, Saul Mullard (2019)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2019:3)
U4 Issue | Jan 2019

Cambodia's anti-corruption regime 2008-2018: A critical political economy approach

(THIS PUBLICATION IS TEMPORARILY UNAVAILABLE DUE TO A REVISION. WE APOLOGISE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE CAUSED). Cambodia's anti-corruption reforms have been critical to consolidating power in the hands of the ruling Cambodian...
Jacqui Baker, Sarah Milne (2019)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2019:1)
U4 Issue | Jan 2019

Addressing corruption risks in multi-partner funds

Donors are increasingly relying on multi-partner funds for delivering results on challenging development and humanitarian issues and in difficult situations. Such funds are therefore growing in number and sophistication in...
Arne Disch, Kirsten Sandberg Natvig (2019)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2019:2)
U4 Issue | 2018

Improving coherence in the illicit financial flows agenda

The illicit financial flows (IFF) agenda has momentum, but weaknesses remain in its foundations, with the definition, measurement, and estimation of IFF, especially as these apply to country level studies....
Alex Erskine, Fredrik Eriksson (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2018:8)
U4 Brief | 2018

The Mozambique hidden loans case: An opportunity for donors to demonstrate anti-corruption commitment

When the Mozambican government issued guarantees for over 1 billion US$ - ignoring their own oversight mechanisms and lending rules - they ended up in public debt distress. Donors have...
David Aled Williams (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Brief 2018:6)
U4 Brief | 2018

The promise and perils of data for anti-corruption efforts in international development work

Big and open data sources can empower development practitioners and aid recipients to reduce the harmful effects of corruption in development. Data on public procurement, campaign contributions, asset disclosure and...
Daniel Berliner, Kendra Dupuy (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Brief 2018:7)
U4 Issue | 2018

Anti-corruption through a social norms lens

A social norms approach can help practitioners design effective anti-corruption reforms. Social norms in communities, families, and organisations help explain why corruption persists. The threat of social sanctions for norm...
David Jackson, Nils Köbis (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2018:7)
U4 Brief | 2018

Promoting global health through clinical trial transparency. Prevent research waste and grand corruption

The current lack of transparency in clinical trials threatens progress on the Sustainable Development Goals' health objectives. Unreported and misreported clinical trial outcomes result in the misallocation of public health...
Till Bruckner (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Brief 2018:5)
U4 Brief | 2018

Harnessing the power of communities against corruption. A framework for contextualising social accountability

Ignorance, apathy and disempowerment are recurring drivers of impunity. Social accountability, on its part, aims to empower citizens with information and provide effective channels through which to exercise agency. For...
Claudia Baez Camargo (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Brief 2018:4)
U4 Issue | 2018

Promoting electoral integrity through aid: Analysis and advice for donors

Despite increased donor spending on electoral integrity, elections in democratising countries often suffer from irregularities, intimidation, and corruption. Based on an analysis of new indicators, we suggest that practitioners should...
Luca J. Uberti , David Jackson (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2018:5)
U4 Issue | 2018

Open data for transparency and accountability in health service delivery: What's new in the digital age?

Open data platforms have a great unexplored potential. Publicly available health data can make service delivery more transparent and accountable. Experience from Peru, Mexico and Uruguay show how civil society...
Fabrizio Scrollini (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2018:6)
U4 Issue | 2018

Capacity building for the Nigerian Navy: Eyes wide shut on corruption?

Pervasive corruption in the Nigerian maritime security sector facilitates smuggling, piracy and oil theft. Building capacity while ignoring corruption risks making corruption and related crimes worse. The United States Africa...
Åse Gilje Østensen, Sheelagh Brady, Sofie Arjon Schütte (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2018:4)
U4 Issue | 2018

The cognitive psychology of corruption. Micro-level explanations for unethical behaviour

Traditional theories of corruption often make assumptions about motivations that may not necessarily be valid. We explored the power of an alternative theoretical paradigm to explain corrupt behaviour: cognitive psychology....
Kendra Dupuy, Siri Neset (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2018:2)
U4 Issue | 2018

Engaging customary authority in community-driven development to reduce corruption risks

Customary authority can provide a source of resistance to corruption and capture of resources in community-driven development ? but it can also be part of those problems. How to know...
Jennifer Murtazashvili , David Jackson (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Issue 2018:3)
U4 Brief | 2018

Close the political gender gap to reduce corruption. How women's political agenda and risk aversion restricts corrupt behaviour

Including women in local councils is strongly negatively associated with the prevalence of both petty and grand forms of corruption. This reduction in corruption is primarily experienced among women. A...
Monika Bauhr, Nicholas Charron, Lena Wängnerud (2018)
Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Brief 2018:3)