War and women in the Sudan: Role change and adjustment to new responsibilities

Julia A. Duany and Wal Duany, Northeast African Studies, Vol. 8, No. 2 (New Series) 2001, pp. 35-62 (available from the CMI Library)

Sudanese women argue that they have become a lifeline for family survival. Men, on the other hand, claim that providing for the family is primarily their duty, while women are merely their helpers. The reality is that in South Sudan women head two out of five households. Every family has lost at least one member, usually a husband or older brother. This has left a vacuum in terms of family support, and many Sudanese women have acquired a new role in becoming sole provider for their household. By Julia A. Duany and Wal Duany, Northeast African Studies, Vol. 8, No. 2 (New Series) 2001, pp. 35-62. Available from the CMI Library


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